Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

In case you missed out on this excellent event PES brings you your exclusive post show report from last month’s, 10th Offshore Energy Exhibition & Conference, which took place in Amsterdam, The Netherlands under the theme Transformation through collaboration. During the Offshore WIND Conference, part of Offshore Energy, as well as on a discussion square on the exhibition floor, there was attention for collaboration between the offshore oil and gas industry on the one hand and the offshore wind industry on the other and how this can transform energy transition on the North Sea. On the North Sea, energy transition is taking place under our eyes. On the hand we see strong growth in offshore wind and on the other hand we witness cessation and decommissioning of oil and gas production activities. At a place on the Offshore Energy exhibition floor called ‘Community Square’ – designed to cater to the entire offshore oil, gas and renewables community – there was a television style talk-show on the future of the North Sea, more specifically on the future of North Sea energy infrastructure. The talk-show was organized in cooperation with the ‘North Sea Energy program’ – a research program financed by the

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With the interest in wind energy on the rise, foundation suppliers are hard pressed to meet the developers’ demands in terms of design, delivery and installation. PES brings you the PEIKKO view from the North, where investment in new turbines is paying off and energy from wind is ever increasing. Wind the most profitable way of producing energy Wind has always been clean, but now it’s also economical. According to the American Wind Energy Association, ‘wind prices are extremely competitive right now, offering lower costs than other possible resources’, while Bloomberg New Energy Finance has noted that ‘onshore wind is fully competitive against gas and coal’. This has created a wind energy boom with some 30,000 new turbines built every year to add to a tally of around 500,000 wind power plants in use around the world. A quantum leap of turbine technology The wind is in the middle of a similar technology leap that revolutionised the cell phone performance and use a decade ago. We have seen a significant increase in the turbine size and power generation figures. ‘If you take the situation three years ago as a baseline and give that an index of 100, we are now at 250,’ Kari Tuominen,

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Gerry Lalonde, CEO, Orenda Energy Solutions, tells PES how he feels wind energy could be exchanged from one location to another. This is certainly food for thought and could make a big difference to small turbine owners, or perspective owners with no space near their current location. One of the chief concerns facing the small/medium wind energy industry is a geographical one, based purely on supply and demand. Imagine a business located in the middle of an urban area that wishes to be self-sustaining with its own ‘green’ electricity supply. If the business is located in an area where there is little or no wind and local planning laws preclude them from siting a small turbine on the property, is there not a conversation to be had with Government, which leads to a relaxing of the rules whereby any business can buy and erect a turbine on a ‘wind-friendly’ landscape, in another part of the country and have access to the equivalent amount of generated energy by these turbines from the grid? Is this not a classic case of supply not being efficiently matched to demand? Current legislation prohibits an energy consumer based on the South Coast of England, to purchase a wind turbine

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• These turbines -the G126-2.5 MW- will be the highest in Asia, with a tip height of 215 metres • The company has already installed 310 MW in this market since its entry in 2011, which is a half of total installed capacity Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy has achieved a new milestone in its positioning in Asia Pacific having secured its largest-ever contract in Thailand, a market in which it is the leading OEM, responsible for more than 50% of the country's total installed capacity. Specifically, Siemens Gamesa has reached an agreement with local developer for the supply of 103 of its G126-2.5 MW turbines (260 MW) at the Hanuman wind complex, being built in the province of Chaiyaphum, in northeast Thailand. This order also marks a new technical feat as it will entail the installation of Asia's highest wind turbines: with a tower height of 153 metres and a blade length of 62 metres, the turbines will stretch 215 metres tall. This marks a new record for Siemens Gamesa, which last summer completed the installation of 33 210-metre tall turbines, the previous record holders. “We are very proud to have secured this order which highlights our commercial strength and positions us as the leading

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Words: Sasaenia P. Oluwabunmi, Kayode E. Oluwabunmi & Athanasios J. Kolios Abstract: The development of adequate energy sources to satisfy the ever increasing energy demand in the world has led to the deployment of several offshore energy installations. Offshore Oil & Gas and renewable energy installations have had a lot of growth in recent years; this growth has led to an increase in the accompanying risks and challenges faced by these industries especially regarding policy implementation. Thus, it is pertinent to assess all the risks in the offshore energy industry, to create a ‘feed-in base’ applicable to both offshore renewables and offshore oil and gas industries. This paper analyses all the risks in the offshore energy industry in relation to policy through Failure Mode and Effects (FMEA) analysis using Risk Prioritisation Numbers (RPNs). 1. Introduction The offshore oil and gas sector generates around £20 billion of revenue per annum and £12.8 billion of Gross Value Added (GVA) whilst supporting induced, indirect and direct employment of more than 190,000 people; thus, making it one of the key sectors of the UK economy [1]. This scenario is true not only for the West but also for major emerging economies; for example, in Nigeria, offshore oil

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Safety is of paramount importance when working at the dizzy height of a wind turbine. Brad Prickett, the senior lubrication engineer at ExxonMobil Fuels & Lubricants, located in Houston, gives PES his insight on how this can be improved. This is his area of expertise as he has worked with wind turbine operators since the mid-2000s. When it comes to the safety of your wind turbine operation, lubrication can have a bigger impact than you might think. That’s because the greatest safety risks to an operation typically occur during equipment servicing and maintenance. Take, for example, a routine oil change. What is a fairly straightforward process for ground-based equipment becomes much more complex for wind turbine equipment, as maintenance teams must ascend the tower, sometimes to elevations as high as 400 feet, before carefully inspecting the equipment to determine if any additional servicing is needed before refilling components with the new oil. This is no easy task, which is why one of the most effective opportunities to enhance the safety of a wind turbine operation is by reducing human-machine interaction (HMI), or the frequency which maintenance personnel interact with wind turbine equipment. Reducing HMIs requires having a robust lubrication program that prevents unnecessary downtime and

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Words: Kristian Holm, VP Renewables & Utilities at Kongsberg Digital A typical wind turbine is equipped with a huge number of sensors, signal processors, and other types of monitoring equipment to ensure that it maintains its autonomous operations. These data points provide a myriad of data which can be used to optimise the operation of the turbine, cutting maintenance costs dramatically. Usually, sensor data are used to maintain normal turbine operation. Temperature sensors reduce or stop the wind turbine if the oil temperature in the gearbox exceeds a set permissible limit. Vibration sensors stop the turbine if the vibrations surpass a set permissible limit. However, these sensors do not simply maintain operations; they add a host of other options to the wind turbine, and these can be used for operational excellence. Did you know that in less than a second a single wind turbine can forward up to 1500 data signals that provide information about the turbine status? If you are really smart, you’ll use this information to define the current condition of the turbine. And if you are really, really smart, you’ll use it to predict the future condition or the remaining useful life of the turbine. Moreover, since wind turbines hold

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PES brings you Jan De Nul’s experience of constructing the Tahkoluoto wind farm. The geographical location, the elements and the difficult terrain all posed different types of challenges. Previous knowledge gained on other ventures, suitable equipment and engineering skills were crucial to the success of this project. Possible ice and rocky soil: these were the conditions in which Jan De Nul Group installed the very first Finnish Offshore Wind Farm, Tahkoluoto. It is named after the port nearby, meaning ‘islet of the grindstones.’ In fact it was hard diabase bedrock below the seabed and a layer of moraine clay and boulders of different sizes on top of it. Being the remains of scraping glaciers in previous glaciation periods, it was a challenging environment in which to construct a wind farm, able to withstand the severe Finnish winters. None of the classical monopile driving methods, such as the one Jan De Nul Group used to construct the Belgian offshore wind farm Nobelwind, could be used here, in the Gulf of Bothnia, because of the soil conditions. An atypical design and construction of the wind turbine foundations was necessary. The only option was to place ballasted foundations on a prepared seabed. This was certainly no practice

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Auctions are becoming the standard instrument for granting state support in almost all European markets. In economic terms, this is the right step to take as it subjects renewables to market forces and rewards the most efficient projects. This was evident in the latest UK Government Contract for Difference (CfD) auction round, designed to support renewable energy projects being delivered in UK waters. One of the winners in the latest CfD auction round, September 2017, was innogy’s Triton Knoll offshore wind farm, located off England’s east coast. PES invited Richard Sandford, innogy Director of Offshore Investment & Asset Management, to give us an insight into this offshore project. ‘Triton Knoll’s auction success confirms the excellent work we have done in recent years, and proved that we can successfully hold our own in a very competitive market environment,’ Richard said. ‘Thanks to our extensive know-how in the development as well as the construction and operation of complex offshore projects, as well as our varied research and development activities we have succeeded in further reducing the costs for offshore wind energy in the UK.’ The industry pulling together to reduce costs and drive innovation innogy’s 860 megawatt Triton Knoll offshore project was allocated a CfD

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Words: Wouter Slob, Tender & Concepts Engineer, Huisman, the Netherlands The development of current and future offshore wind farms is picking up with wind installation contractors further optimising their toolboxes for efficient installation of offshore wind turbines. Up to now the jack-up vessel has been the platform of choice for installation of wind turbines; providing a stable platform, which when jacked up, uses a crane which reaches high enough to install the nacelle of the wind turbines. Building larger size jack-ups is a costly affair; the Foldable Offshore Crane offers a crane solution, which can increase the installation capabilities of such an asset, offering the same effective lift height with a shorter crane, compared to conventional fixed boom cranes while increasing the payload capacity. With the ever increasing size of wind turbines and the need to make efficient use of the stable platform provided by jack-up vessels, it is invaluable to be able to increase the lifting envelope of the crane, both in height, width and load. This can result in a vessel layout on which a crane boom extends far beyond the main vessel dimensions. In this setup the boom is largely unsupported during transit conditions, resulting in unwanted fatigue wear. The

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