Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

Vaisala adds industry-leading LiDAR systems to its product portfolio, providing advanced tools for wind measurement in any market and any environment.  Vaisala, a global leader in environmental and industrial measurement, has announced the acquisition of Leosphere SAS, a world leader in ground-based and nacelle-mounted LiDAR equipment for the wind energy industry. As project developers and operators worldwide turn to remote sensing to capture wind data at today’s increasing hub-heights, the acquisition will see Leosphere’s Windcube and Wind Iris LiDARs join Vaisala’s Triton Wind Profiler as part of the market’s most comprehensive range of measurement equipment. “The advantages and opportunities remote sensing units bring throughout the lifecycle of a modern wind farm are now well-understood. It is common practice for wind energy firms to deploy LiDAR and SoDAR to inform crucial decisions relating to site prospecting, resource assessment, and turbine performance testing,” said Jarkko Sairanen, Executive Vice President, Weather and Environment, Vaisala. “Adoption of these more versatile measurement technologies to augment conventional met towers is a key factor in enabling the wind industry to increase the scale of project development, not only through larger, more advanced turbines, but also in new, remote markets worldwide.” A Complementary Product Portfolio Vaisala’s customers can now benefit from a

Read More

On September 30, 2018, one day before the China National Holiday, LM Wind Power signed a three-year agreement to supply wind turbine blades for Goldwind's onshore 3-4 MW platform. The 1.1 GW agreement follows a 140 MW pre-agreement signed last year. This is the largest deal between Goldwind and LM Wind Power since 2010. This agreement covers three blade types - the LM 66.9 P, LM 66.9 P2 and LM 69.0 P - targeted for both international and the domestic China markets. Between 2018 and 2021, the blades will be manufactured at LM Wind Power's plant in Qin Huang Dao, in the northeastern part of China. Xu Lei, Goldwind Product Delivery Center General Manger, said: "This agreement is a milestone between Goldwind and LM Wind Power, setting up a successful model of strong, strategic cooperation between our two companies. Goldwind is committed to delivering turbines that meet the highest quality and reliability standards. With LM Wind Power's new 3-4 MW 66.9- and 69.0-meter blades, we know we get the quality, technology and reliable manufacturing expertise required by both the Chinese and international markets." Dorte Kamper, LM Wind Power Vice President of Sales & Marketing, said: "We are thrilled by our extended partnership with Goldwind.

Read More

The offshore wind market in the U.S. is about to take off and there are enormous growth projections. For the installation of the first wave of U.S. wind parks starting in 2020, European built and operated installation jack-ups will be needed, because currently no U.S. built jack-ups have the capacity to install the turbines. Nor will this type of equipment be built in time in the U.S. PES takes a closer look at the options. There are plans to build installation jack-ups in the U.S., but it is likely that these will only kick-off after the first wind farms prove to be a success. Aside from this, the infrastructure of the U.S. ports is not suitable for these big vessels, there are bridges and hurricane breakers preventing the jack-up installation vessels to enter or leave the harbors. New hubs and ports will have to be developed before U.S. flagged installation jack-ups will become a practical tool for the installation of the parks. The problem with using European installation jack-ups, apart from the a fore mentioned infrastructural problems, is the Jones Act. The Jones Act requires vessels transporting merchandise from U.S. point to U.S. point to be U.S. manned, built, flagged and owned.

Read More

Van Oord is a leading global contractor in dredging, offshore oil and gas and offshore wind, and is celebrating its 150th anniversary this year. The company has a long and varied history in marine engineering, an industry that has its origins in the Netherlands. Over the past 150 years Van Oord, a family-owned business, has grown into one of the largest marine engineering companies in the world. The origins of Dutch marine engineering lie in the Netherlands’ unique location on the North Sea and its centuries-long battle against the water. Van Oord’s work is rooted in that battle. The history of the company is intertwined with the country’s biggest marine engineering projects, including the Nieuwe Waterweg Canal, the Delta Works, and the Port of Rotterdam’s Maasvlakte II expansion. These were projects that fuelled economic growth and kept the Dutch population safe from flooding. Since the late nineteenth century, the company has also applied its expertise abroad. Van Oord extended the port of Surabaya, constructed the Palm Islands in Dubai, dredged the Suez Canal, and installed the Gemini offshore wind park. They have gained a great deal of knowledge and experience over the years, and the company has grown to become one

Read More

• Miguel Ángel López, current CFO, appointed new non-executive Chairman of the Board of Directors, replacing Rosa García, effective December 1st • David Mesonero will succeed López as CFO • New COO function to be introduced to strengthen focus on cost-out efforts • The CEO of the Onshore Business Unit, Ricardo Chocarro, will leave the company. Mark Albenze, CEO of the Service Business Unit, will take over in the interim in addition to his current responsibilities Entering into the next phase of its strategic plan towards global leadership Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy (SGRE) is adjusting its leadership team and organizational structure to better respond to the dynamic market environment. “Eighteen months after the merger we are concluding the first phase of our strategic plan centred around merging and stabilizing the company. We have achieved a great deal in terms of winning new business and integrating our company. In the next phase, our efforts will focus on leveraging economies of scale and creating the foundation for sustainable profitability. The changes we announced today will strengthen the organization for the challenges ahead. I’m convinced that these steps are the right ones to ensure the future success of our company,” said Markus Tacke, CEO of Siemens Gamesa. The Board

Read More

Tuesday, October 16, 2018 — GeoSea, DEME’s specialist in complex offshore marine engineering projects, has been awarded a contract for the transportation and installation of 94 foundations at Ørsted’s Borssele 1 & 2 offshore wind farm in the Netherlands. Additionally, GeoSea secured the contract for the transport and installation of 94 turbines at the wind farm. Borssele 1 & 2 is located 23 km from the Dutch coast and will have a total capacity of 752 MW. GeoSea will be responsible for the full scope of the Borssele 1 & 2 foundation installation and scour supply and installation. In this project, GeoSea will transport and install the 94 wind turbine foundation structures including the supply, transport and installation of scour protection on each location. The foundation type for the 94 wind turbines will be a monopile foundation with pre-installed scour protection, an anode cage and a bolted transition piece. Water depths range from 14 to 36 metres. Under a separate contract, A2SEA The turbine installation experts within GeoSea will also provide installation vessel capacity to transport and install 94 Siemens Gamesa 8 MW turbines at the Borssele 1 & 2 wind farm. Jan Klaassen, business unit manager offshore renewables for GeoSea: “We are pleased

Read More

Our renewable electricity energy needs are growing in a world that is constantly evolving. The market requires more renewable energy for less money. The reduction of government subsidies means that the industry needs to start looking for ways to increase its efficiency. More energy for less money There are different possibilities for lowering the levelized cost of energy, such as avoiding unexpected downtimes (reducing the operational costs), extending the lifetime of the infrastructure, and increasing the power output. By integrating digital technology into the intelligent gearboxes developed by ZF Wind Power, customers will be able to improve all three aspects. Avoiding unexpected gearbox downtime The cost of an unexpected gearbox failure can be significant, especially when cranes or vessels are needed at short notice. Additionally, when certain spare parts are not available at the right time, it can cause significant turbine downtime. Thanks to digital technology, every gearbox will leave ZF Wind Power’s factory with its own unique digital birth certificate. The certificate contains all the gearbox manufacturing information and can be accessed online by ZF’s and partnered service organizations. This way, ZF’s service team can calculate the consumed lifetime of each bearing and gear pair within a gearbox, combining the actual measured loads with knowledge about

Read More

This briefing is intended as an update on three key policy and case law developments that have taken place over the summer. 1 New European Court ruling – ‘Sweetman II’ On 25 July 2018, the Court of Justice of the European Union (the Court) delivered its ruling in the case of Edel Grace and Peter Sweetman v An Bord Pleanala, or ‘Sweetman II’ (also known by some in the industry as ‘People over Wind II’.) The judgment developed the position taken in People Over Wind and Peter Sweetman v Coillte Teoranta (‘Sweetman I’), delivered in April this year. The Court again focused on the interpretation of Article 6 of the Habitats Directive, which concerns the need for an appropriate assessment where a project is likely to have a significant effect on a site (onshore or offshore) designated as a special protection area or a special area of conservation (SPAs and SACs) The key question for the Court was at what point in the assessment under this Directive should mitigation measures be taken into account. Current practice relating to appropriate assessment is based on a four-stage approach. Briefly, these stages are: (i) Screening to establish whether a likely significant effect may exist on the integrity of a designated

Read More

PES caught up with Carsten Kofoed, Managing Director & Hans Christian Hansen, Director of Operations at Vento Maritime, to find out more about this young company, with years of experience behind it. By following the weather and planning ahead it’s possible to make substantial savings in time and fuel and thus decrease costs. Offshore operators need to have an eye on the weather forecasts. PES: Welcome to you both to PES Wind magazine. Thanks for talking with us. Would you like to begin by explaining a little about the background and experience of Vento Maritime and the importance of the wind industry to you? Carsten Kofoed & Hans Christian Hansen: Vento Maritime is a Danish weather service company, which we founded in Copenhagen in January 2017. Together we have more than 20 years of experience in the maritime business, within meteorology, oceanography and operational MetOcean services. We are dedicated to helping maritime customers save time while, improving safety at sea. We are only into maritime weather. Our marine forecasters are dedicated meteorologists and are all WMO-certified, with years of experience in understanding the needs of maritime customers. The team is passionate about excellent customer service and the art of communicating meteorological and oceanographic

Read More

On a European level, two significant breakthroughs were achieved in energy policy during the summer: the European target for the share of renewable energies in the electricity supply will be increased to 32 percent by 2030. In addition, EU-member states are obliged to submit detailed plans by the end of 2019 regarding the deployment of renewables to contribute to achieve the EU-wide target of 32 percent. This includes a five years’ visibility on future auction timetable and volumes. Member states cannot change their energy policies on a year-to-year basis, hence more reliability can be achieved for the companies and capital cost can be reduced, due to less regulatory risk. After the general election in Germany, it took quite a while to form a new government. An ambitious attempt to form a ‘Jamaica’-Coalition (Conservative-Black, Liberal-Yellow and Green) failed, so that a new version of the old government was formed by the Conservatives and the Social Democrats. Many hopes for an ambitious renewable, yet market-oriented energy policy were buried. In spite of the bleak expectations of most observers, the coalition agreement included some very ambitious cornerstones, such as a 65 percent target for renewable energies in the electricity sector, 4 GW extra volume for

Read More