Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

Sofia Regell Hallström, Marketing Project Manager at MMT, came in to talk to PES about their latest all-inclusive surveys. Innovation and customer service are integral to the services provided. PES: Welcome to PES Wind magazine. Would you like to begin by explaining a little about the background of your organisation and how you currently serve the wind industry? Sofia Regell Hallström: MMT was founded in 1976 and has since then developed into a mid-size marine survey company with 250 staff. Today MMT is a key supplier to both the oil and gas sector as well as the renewable energy sector. From software developments to the latest remotely operated vehicle solutions, MMT has always had a strong focus on innovation in order to supply their clients with the best possible survey data on the market. Hydrographic, geophysical, geotechnical, environmental and UXO surveys are core business. Today, approximately 60 % of the turnover comes from the offshore wind and subsea cables where the UXO surveys, shallow geotechnical services as well as the environmental studies are also a key focus as well as the full scope of geophysical investigations. PES: We know you work in a variety of sectors so how important is the offshore

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Renewable energy, primarily wind and solar, will represent the largest source of electricity growth over the next five years, driven by falling costs and aggressive expansion in emerging economies. Globally, progress continues to be strong with increasing annual installed capacity and investments. As solar power becomes more economical, wind systems have to become competitive to continue to grow. Consequently, development of new technologies which reduce turbine maintenance and life cycle costs, improve reliability and lower levelised cost of energy (LCoE) will result in wider adoption of wind power generating systems. LCoE is one of the utility industry’s primary metrics for the cost of electricity produced by a generator. Key inputs to calculating LCoE include capital costs, fuel costs, fixed and variable operations and maintenance (O&M) costs, financing costs, and an assumed utilization rate for each generator. Wind asset operators understand that O&M costs must be minimized to maximize energy generation. Thus, turbine reliability and high energy throughput are a critical measure of wind generation. Although all components in a wind turbine must work reliably, a turbine’s wind pitch system, whether electric or hydraulic, is a key component required for optimum blade pitch control under adverse wind conditions; to maintain turbine

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Later this year, the blades on the world’s first full-scale floating wind farm will start to turn, harnessing the winds that hurtle from the continental shelf. Hywind Scotland will literally sit on the North Sea, 26 kilometres to the East of Aberdeen. But while big winds make it a perfect site for energy generation, they will often be accompanied by big seas. In the Buchan-Deep, waves of over 1.5m Significant Height will prevail for up to half of the year and ensuring that turbines are productive in these environments will require new solutions to getting maintenance technicians safely and cost-effectively onto and off turbines in high seas. With this access challenge in mind, Edinburgh based Limpet Technology is embarking on the development of a new access system that aims to allow technicians and loads to transfer between vessels and offshore wind turbines more safely and in higher sea states.  Supported by an innovation grant from Scottish Enterprise, the overarching technical objective of the project is to deliver a solution that will allow safe and reliable access to offshore turbines in waves of up to and beyond 2.5 metres Significant Height (Hs). Limpet Technology’s CEO, Stephen Cornwallis commented. “To make operations and maintenance

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PES caught up with Andreas Jagtøyen, Senior Vice President, Energy Division, Kongsberg Digital AS, who gave us a full account of their EmPower software suite. A way for wind farm asset managers to make informed choices to maximise production and reduce costs. PES: Welcome to PES Wind magazine. Thanks for talking with us. Would you like to begin by explaining a little about the background of Kongsberg and the importance of the offshore wind industry to you? Andreas Jagtøyen: KONGSBERG finds the offshore wind industry highly interesting, especially seen in the light of increased need for renewable energy. One of the main reasons for our interest is that the offshore wind market shares many interesting commonalities with what we're doing in both the maritime area and in the oil and gas area. In addition, the offshore wind market is experiencing exceptional growth, and, although it is little known, KONGSBERG has long experience with the offshore wind industry, having supplied sensor systems and services to the wind sector for more than 20 years.

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After a difficult period, the heavy lift industry is making changes and diversifying. PES finds out how one such company is meeting the challenge head on. All the know-how and expertise is already in place for what looks like the beginning of a heavy lift revival. HANSA HEAVY LIFT, which specialises in heavy lift, super heavy lift and project cargo, is stepping up its involvement in the offshore industry with a strong focus on transportation and installation (T&I) in the subsea oil and gas market, as well as the offshore wind farm sector. Wholly owned by the investment company Oaktree, the shipping line manages a fleet of 17 vessels and operates a dynamic positioning class 3 (DP3) construction vessel, which is ideally suited for offshore installation projects. With the heavy lift industry in a state of flux and still recovering from a period of overcapacity, HANSA HEAVY LIFT sees much potential for the future in the offshore T&I market. The carrier notes there was a steep drop in investment in the project and heavy lift market in 2016, and very little activity going forward for new projects.

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Coming off a record year in 2015, where a ‘perfect storm’ of circumstances pushed the Chinese market to 30 GW and the global market past 60 GW, 2016 was a solid if mostly unspectacular year for the wind power industry. More than 54 GW of clean renewable power was installed across the global market, which now comprises more than 90 countries, including 9 with more than 10,000 MW installed, and 29 which have now passed the 1,000 MW mark. Cumulative capacity grew by 12.6% to reach a total of 486.8 GW. Wind power penetration levels continue to increase, led by Denmark pushing 40%, followed by Uruguay, Portugal and Ireland with well over 20%, Spain and Cyprus around 20%, Germany at 16%; and the big markets of China, the US and Canada get 4, 5.5, and 6% of their power from wind, respectively. Much of the reduction from the 2015 market was because China ‘only’ installed 23 GW instead of 2015’s phenomenal 30 GW. The 2015 numbers were driven by an impending cut in the feed-in-tariff which came into effect in January 2016. We face the same situation again in 2017, with an impending tariff reduction on January 2018. While we don’t

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The past decade has been a period of large evolutionary steps for offshore wind and the upcoming years are set to continue this trend, further establishing wind power as a maturing player in the global energy mix. As economy of scale is driving up the size of turbines and wind farms, the offshore units used to install and maintain these offshore farms are evolving as well. The step-up in capacity of these units opens up possibilities to incorporate another dynamic, cleaner and evolving player in the energy mix; LNG or Liquefied Natural Gas, which is gaining traction as a fuel for various sectors of the offshore and maritime industry. These industries are experiencing increasingly stricter global and local emission limits, mainly due to a continuing rise in environmental awareness and subsequent political initiatives. The most recent and perhaps far-reaching example of this is the global Sulphur cap of 0.5% on marine fuels, set to come into effect in 2020. Hence, lowering emissions, fuel consumption and the overall growth of alternative power generation is a prominent maritime development. Offshore wind farm installation and maintenance operations offer favourable conditions for the use of LNG. This is due to the relatively high predictability of the

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Abstract: Larger wind turbines and increasing water depths are presenting industry with new challenges for the realisation of economical foundation systems. The issues confronting industry here are manifold and include not only the optimisation and validation of structures or soil-structure interaction models, but also the development of economical installation methods with mitigated noise levels. Experimental validation of prediction models Optimised calculation methods are required for the economical design of support or foundation structures. The engineer has a broad range of prediction models with different levels of complexity available for this purpose. During the design process, these models complement each other and can be categorised as semi-empirical models, analytical models, or numerical models. The decision as to which of these models represents the engineering problem with sufficient accuracy is usually based on experience. All models have one thing in common though: Regardless of whether they are simple or complex, they have to be validated with the aid of physical experiments before they can be utilised. A distinction is made here between small-scale, large-scale, and real-scale experimental tests. Since the load-bearing and deformation behaviour of the soil depends on the stress level, small-scale tests (scale 1:100 to 1:30) are often not sufficiently accurate

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Words: Dr Ralf Köpke The reactions in the German, specialist media have been consistently positive. Last September, Deutsche Windtechnik which is based in Bremen announced that it had acquired a 70 percent stake in the Dutch company OutSmart B.V. One of the comments was, "Germany's largest independent service provider in the wind energy sector is strategically positioning itself to win additional contracts for work at sea." OutSmart is not the first company in Germany or abroad that Deutsche Windtechnik has acquired a stake in but it is one that opens up many new opportunities. "Our own range of services had hardly any overlap with Deutsche Windtechnik's, so we complement each other perfectly," said Erwin Coolen, one of the three managing directors and founders of the Dutch service provider. He sees the merger as a 'classic win-win situation'. Even stronger together A look at the areas in which both companies have been active until now shows that this is true. In 2013, the German company established a subsidiary called Deutsche Windtechnik Offshore und Consulting GmbH which focused mainly on service and maintenance tasks. Consulting and project support were seen as additional businesses. The offshore wind farm management activities of the Dutch company, on the other hand,

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Words: Linda Blunk in cooperation with Blanke Meier Evers Project developers of offshore wind power have growing concerns, even anxieties, which mirror their apprehension about a basic injustice inherent in the future tendering process stipulated by the new German Offshore Wind Energy Act (WindSeeG). This apprehension has already led to numerous legal inquiries which focus on the following question: Is the tendering procedure pursuant to the WindSeeG unconstitutional, more specifically, can a project developer, who has lost a bid, correct the tender procedure or can he even enforce the award? I. Tendering Process during the Transition Period There are numerous examples in German jurisdiction, where tender results have been set aside by a court. For example, Landgericht Köln (Regional Court, Cologne) recently ruled in favour of a utility company, providing energy, water and waste disposal, that had alleged that the tender process had been ‘opaque and discriminatory’ because at an early stage a certain bidder (“ENWOR”) had been favoured, thus robbing other bidders of their chance of success and stage managing the process. In the realm of offshore wind energy there are also numerous bidders with scant chance of success who are in competition with handful of bidders with good prospects. This is the

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