Power & Energy Solutions

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The daughter craft for wind farms far from shore Over the last three years we have seen the introduction of purpose-built Service Offshore Vessels (SOV). These 70-100 m long vessels service wind farms, where a long distance to shore makes a land-based service organization impractical. Typically, 40-60 technicians live onboard the vessels and are transferred to the wind turbines with motion compensated walk-to-work gangways. A challenge for this operation is the efficiency of getting the technicians around the wind farm. The SOV transits at typically 10 knots and needs time for accurate positioning, to set out and also collect the personnel. This is the background for using daughter craft. Deployed and retrieved by a davit system onboard the SOV, she can complement the gangway, shuttle between the SOV and turbines near and far throughout the wind farm. So far these daughter craft have been of similar type to existing small rescue crafts. Monohull, 10-12 m in length and weight 8-15 tons. But these small vessels can transfer to the turbines in limited wave height, typically up to 1 to 1.2 m significant wave height and will therefore get limited weather windows. An alternative is to use larger Crew Transfer Vessels (CTV) of

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Although being versatile is not a goal on its own, it does pay off to be able to meet the ever-changing requirements of the offshore market. The saying ‘the best laid plans of mice and men often go awry’ is confirmed in the offshore market on a daily basis. Working around these changes of plan can be difficult and may even push your assets to the limits of their capabilities. This is where ELA Container Offshore is able to alleviate the stress, using their highly versatile fleet of container modules. Whether you need additional storage facilities onboard your offshore assets, or you are looking to add workstations, office areas or even living quarters, ELA is able to assist. The offshore modules are available ex-stock and are suitable for deployment in any offshore environment, on both fixed- and mobile assets. The challenge In order to complete projects in the offshore environment, it is critical to ensure availability of all tools, resources and equipment onsite. These projects can involve a wide array of assets, ranging from offshore platforms to wind-turbines and vessels of any shape and size, but also includes monitoring stations, transmission towers and any other installation at, or below sea level. Containers

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The reliability of an offshore wind turbine and the resources required to maintain it can make up ~30% of the overall cost of energy, thus determining and understanding offshore wind turbine failure rates is vital for modelling and reducing O&M costs and in turn minimizing the levelized cost of energy (LCoE). The reliability of an offshore wind turbine and the resources required to maintain it can make up ~30% of the overall cost of energy, thus determining and understanding offshore wind turbine failure rates is vital for modelling and reducing O&M costs and in turn minimizing the levelized cost of energy (LCoE). One of the main optimization challenges that offshore wind faces is the cost of Operation and Maintenance activities, especially because of the difficulties associated with access for maintenance. The reliability of an offshore wind turbine and the resources required to maintain it can make up ~30% of the overall cost of energy, thus determining and understanding offshore wind turbine failure rates is vital for modelling and reducing O&M costs and in turn minimizing the levelized cost of energy (LCoE). Even if the documentation on offshore failure rates is rather poor in the past, some recent analyses have already identified

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Newly developed ground-based winch system shortens the amount of time needed to replace large components When a large component of a wind turbine fails, the operator often has no other choice but to have the damaged component replaced. This often involves a considerable amount of organisational work and financial expense – not just for the spare part itself but also for the logistics and infrastructure required to carry out the replacement. The loss of income due to system downtime also has a significant impact. The service provider GFW, a subsidiary of Deutsche Windtechnik, has developed a new ground-based winch system (GBWS for short) for replacing large components that can save tens or even hundreds of thousands of euros. Using the laws of nature for specific purposes The GBWS’s intelligent system of pulling and weight mechanisms makes the use of large cranes and the modification of local infrastructure that goes along with it unnecessary. The heart of the GBWS consists of load winches, support winches, support frames, counterweights and a control system. After the support frame has been securely set up on a suitable surface, the load ropes are pulled to the hub of the wind turbine. Depending on the type of large component

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PES brings you a show preview not to be missed. Now more than ever it’s important to keep up to date with what’s going on in our industry. Physical meetings are not currently possible, but there’s no reason not to keep up with the latest virtual offerings. Don’t miss out! RenewableUK’s Global Offshore Wind 2020 virtual conference and exhibition takes place from 28th to 30th October. It presents an ideal opportunity to immerse yourself within the captivating world of offshore wind, to engage with key players throughout the offshore wind supply chain and get up-to-date with the very latest ideas and innovations in the field. Key themes this year will focus on how the industry continues to move forward following COVID-19, the race to net zero and upcoming infrastructure investment programmes. Given the challenges we have seen this year, it has never been so important to re-connect with the industry. Plus, you can do it all from the comfort and convenience of your own home! A first for RUKGOW20 For the first time, the Global Offshore Wind conference and exhibition is going online. While we appreciate this will not offer the same experience as visiting in person, RenewableUK have done everything we can

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As the world begins to open up again after the devastation of COVID-19, Cargostore Worldwide talks to PES Wind about how they have managed to stay profitable during the pandemic. We explore the company’s timeline of growth over the last three years which has led to their current position in the offshore container industry. 2017 - Cargostore Containers LLC established in U.A.E In late 2017, Cargostore Worldwide formalized their expansion into the U.A.E by opening Cargostore Containers LLC, based in Abu Dhabi, appointing Sohail Ashraf as General Manager. The move cemented their position in the market as a leading supplier of DNV 2.7-1 certified containers to offshore oil and gas projects in the region. With oil and gas production on the rise, the Abu Dhabi National Oil Corporation (ADNOC) had made known their intention to enforce the DNV 2.7-1 standard for offshore cargo carrying units, and to phase out the less safe ‘hybrid units’ which were common in the region. As Cargostore’s entire offshore fleet were already DNV 2.7-1 certified, they were ahead of the curve, which led to them supporting large projects in the region. ‘I was thrilled to join the Cargostore team in 2017 at the forefront of Cargostore Containers

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The global energy transition is underway. The uptake of renewables is accelerating, as the technology undercuts fossil fuel based energy generation and governments seek to achieve international climate targets. Renewable energy is now also accepted as an opportunity to drive green economic growth and job creation to help support the recovery from the impacts of Covid-19. Offshore wind has a key role to play in this energy transition, having grown nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018. The IEA predicts global offshore wind capacity to increase fifteen-fold by 2040, becoming a US$1 trillion industry. After successfully lowering the price of bottom-fixed projects, the next frontier for industry is floating offshore wind. Floating wind unlocks new markets A key factor driving the development and scaling of floating wind is the technology’s ability to unlock new markets for offshore wind development. An estimated 80% of global offshore wind resource is located in deep water areas (depths of more than 60m), where winds are typically stronger and more consistent, with the potential to yield superior capacity factors. The first larger capacity floating wind turbine (2.3MW) was installed and tested over a decade ago in Norway. Since then interest has increased as the viability

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Global leader in offshore wind signs muli-million pound deal with Scottish engineering innovator Hornsea Two offshore wind farm to become first in the world to design out boat landings and ladders from turbine foundations   Thursday 15 October 2020 Ørsted has signed a multi-million pound deal with Scottish engineering innovator Pict Offshore to deploy the ‘Get Up Safe’ (GUS) motion-compensated lifting system at the Hornsea Two offshore wind farm. The deal with Pict Offshore means that Hornsea Two, which will become the world’s largest offshore wind farm on completion in 2022, will be the first ever offshore wind farm to deploy the GUS system and entirely design out the boat landing structures and ladders on the turbine’s foundations. The addition of the revolutionary GUS system onto each of its 165 wind turbines means external ladders are no longer necessary, streamlining the foundation and reducing steelwork requirements – boosting both safety and the potential for construction and through-life cost reductions. With the GUS system in place, technicians will be lifted and lowered directly between crew transfer vessel and the platform. This removes the need for technicians to step between the bow of the vessel and the ladder; a potentially dangerous operation that requires skilled co-ordination to be

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Trelleborg’s applied technologies operation will exhibit its innovative cable protection system, NjordGuard, at Global Offshore Wind, a virtual conference and exhibition which takes place online from 28 to 30 October, 2020. Andy Smith, Product Group Manager for Trelleborg’s applied technologies operation, states: “With a track-record as subsea polymer engineering experts and over 30 years of experience, we take pride in our renowned engineering capabilities and approach to offshore wind cable protection systems for both floating and fixed foundations. “One of the ways that Trelleborg is supporting growth in the offshore wind industry, is through the development of new solutions in collaboration with operators and installers, solving the unique challenges faced by customers and providing protection for vital infrastructure.” Njordguard is easily assembled on a vessel to allow speedy installation, while it’s highly abrasion resistant API 17L certified Uraduct® material enables it to travel over the seabed without damage, extending cable life. Most importantly, it facilitates installation, reuse and removal without diver and ROV intervention, optimizing efficiency and maximizing safety. Global Offshore Wind is a virtual online conference and exhibition, enabling attendees to hear from a wide range of industry experts and thought leaders, network and connect with exhibitors and learn more about the

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As the occurrence of natural disasters increases, grid hardening and resiliency technologies are critical to outage prevention and recovery Oct. 14, 2020 – Boulder, Colo. – A new report from Guidehouse Insights discusses key grid hardening and resiliency technologies for deployment on transmission and distribution (T&D) networks. The global electric grid is transforming from a unidimensional system of power producers and consumers into a multidimensional, cloud-enabled network. As such, it is more critical than ever for utilities and solutions providers to prioritize grid hardening and resiliency technologies. Click to tweet: According to a new report from @WeAreGHInsights, utilities must strategically invest in automation, control, visibility, and resiliency technologies. “The frequency and scale of natural disasters increases year over year, and outages are simultaneously becoming less tolerable and more expensive to utility customers,” says Michael Hartnack, senior research analyst with Guidehouse Insights. “Increasing outages linked to natural disasters, wildfires, and other events is adding to the threat of deregulation and distributed energy resources integration into the traditional utility business model.” To improve outage prevention and recovery, Guidehouse Insights recommends that utilities, solutions providers, and regulators and stakeholders proactively think ahead and consider long-term demands of both customers and the physical grid network. Stakeholders should be

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