Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

As the wind energy industry sees sturdy growth, businesses are gearing up for surging demand. Amid what is likely to be an increasingly competitive global market, manufacturers and suppliers will need to show consistently high levels of products, services and support in order to keep a strong client base. Kirsten Tschauder of Castrol Industrial Lubricants & Services explains why her company is well positioned to take on the challenge. {pagebreak}PES: How did Castrol Industrial Lubricants & Services get involved in wind energy? Kirsten Tschauder: Our involvement dates back to the 1980s, when we started working with OEMs supplying wind turbine manufacturers. They were looking for products to overcome some of the problems that were seen at that time, and micro pitting was a particular issue. This phenomenon is still one of the main concerns today in gearbox-driven units. Using experience we had gained in other industries, coupled with the special additive systems in our gear oils, we were able to improve gear life, leading to improved reliability and operating uptime. PES: How are you organised to serve the Wind Energy industry?

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When Size MattersHarry Kyogoku, Zephyr CorporationWhen it comes to creating renewable energy, the Zephyr Corporation has learnt that size is now more important than ever before. Founded in 1997, the Japanese firm's success has soared with a continued growth in sales of their Micro Wind Generators and Airdolphin models. With the European market top of their agenda, the corporation's success shows no signs of slowing down, however, Harry Kyogoku explains why they are interested in selling a little closer to home.{pagebreak}At Zephyr, our aim is to encourage growth within the domestic market and this is looking more and more likely. The private sector accounts for 40% of total sales of Zephyr in Japan, with their attentions steered firmly toward the environment. The public sector, including government and municipalities make up a further 20%, as do schools, and the remaining 20% is bought by customised applications such as: mountain lodges, remote surveillance monitors and emergency use. Despite having been established for more than 20 years, the small wind generator (SWG) market is still to get off the ground on a global basis. However, as the recent entry of powerful new products in progress in Europe, USA and Japan has shown, the

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Don't waste your energy.Soren Qvist Vestesen discusses how a Vestesen A/S Danvest Wind Diesel System can slash operational and maintenance costs, maximise output potential and cut down on waste energy, with an easily managed automatic back-up system Based in Denmark, Vestesen.{pagebreak}A/S is one of the world's leading technology specialists for wind-diesel systems with high wind penetration. Previous and in-hand projects range from 100 to 10,000 kW. With contacts worldwide, the company has full access to the global market, working in remote areas on every continent. In remote areas, electricity is commonly not connected to a grid, meaning power supply can unreliable and very expensive. This is where Vestesen can step in to deliver individually adapted wind-diesel systems to produce inexpensive, high-quality electricity 100% of the time. Under normal circumstances, wind turbines will reduce diesel consumption in such areas by 50-90%.Wind energy facts.Wind energy is one of the cleanest and most cost-efficient sources of energy available today, so, in areas of high wind potential, it makes absolute sense to generate energy through wind turbines. A wind year will typically feature around 1,000 hours of calm wind speeds of 0- 5 m/sec, 6,500 hours of moderate 5-10 m/sec wind speeds, around 1,000

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Innovative technology for excellent resultsAt ENERCON GmbH in Emden, Germany, tailor-made, high-performance solutions optimise precast segment production, says Bastian Bicher, Corporate Product Engineer for Concrete at Sika Services AG's renewable energy branch.As the threat of global warming has become a matter of urgency, so the race to lower greenhouse gas emissions has gained momentum. A natural knock-on effect of this is that the renewable energy sectors are receiving a lot more attention than they ever have before. The target is to achieve a sustainable energy mix, which requires the development of a sturdy renewable industry.{pagebreak}The latest assessment report of the United Nations states that renewable energy should meet 30-35% of electricity demand by 2030. Wind energy will play a major role in meeting this target, along with other contenders such as hydropower and solar power. The key will be the development of new renewable energy sources and the continuous enhancement of economically viable production methods for the established sources including wind energy.ENERCON GmbH is the market leader in Germany and worldwide number three for wind turbine production. The company started to build concrete towers, using prestressed precast concrete segments, in 2000. Today, precast segments are produced in Magdeburg and Emden,

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Smart meters are key to cutting domestic energy consumption. Dr Thomas Dittrich of Tadiran Batteries explains how his production line plays a vital role in the value chain, offering durability and cost efficiency through sophisticated technology.{pagebreak}Smart meters make it possible to cut energy consumption by as much as 10-15%, making a huge contribution towards energy efficiency and climate protection. To guarantee a reliable, low-maintenance life-cycle of up to 20 years requires high-quality, reliable small parts, including batteries.Tadiran batteries are sealed by means of a hermetic glass-to-metal seal. The battery's suitability can be verified within a reasonable space of time using various tests. Test results are supported by practical experience with batteries that have been in use for more than 20 years.Batteries for back-up and RTCSmart electricity meters require a real-time clock (RTC) that continues to run in the event of a power cut - a function that requires a back-up battery.

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