Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

TradeWind – the European project funded under the EU’s Intelligent Energy-Europe programme – has recently published an essential 100-page paper on the state of the European wind power industry. In this exclusive extract from the comprehensive, hard-hitting report, PES picks out all the important and salient issues facing us all as we move into an uncertain future.{pagebreak}Nevertheless, the good news is that the report concludes that the recent rapid growth in wind power generation – triggered by technological and industrial development and the move towards sustainable economics – indicates that wind power should be seen as one of the main domestic sources for electricity generation within the European Union.  IntroductionEurope’s dependency on imported fossil fuel has become a threat to economic stability, increasing uncertainties over energy prices. At the same time, the European electricity industry is facing a huge challenge related to generation capacity investment needed in the coming years. The surplus capacity that existed in some countries prior to liberalisation is diminishing and many existing power plants are getting closer to decommissioning. For these reasons, one of the key points on the European energy policy agenda is to increase the share of demand covered from renewable energy sources. European

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pes presents half a dozen lessons, which if heeded in future offshore projects, together with the other parts of the offshore wind ecosystem, we can make for smoother, quicker, and cheaper installations and ultimately, better windfarms for the production of clean energy.{pagebreak}Over the years we have all heard much about the potential of offshore wind as an energy source. Now, in 2009, the industry has finally reached a position to begin realising much of that potential. The projections for offshore wind are staggering: currently there are plans for almost 40GW of offshore wind energy in the UK, and as is well known, Denmark and the UK currently lead the world in installed offshore capacity.  In Germany, where the first offshore windfarm is expected to be powering German homes and communities by the end of this year, the expectation is that by 2030, 15% of German electricity consumption will come from offshore wind. Around the North Sea, many countries have set similar targets for themselves; the European Wind Energy Association has a projected target of 40GW offshore by 2020. These are huge, challenging goals that recognise the potential of offshore wind as a key part of any attempt to move away

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The Times of London has just published its first green global rich list, with many tycoons and executives from the wind industry making the top 100, including the USA’s Warren Buffett who tops the poll at number one, being worth a cool Euro 37bn. Here, PES presents your handy guide to the top 10 movers and shakers in the wind power industry.{pagebreak}The list shows the true degree of enthusiasm among the world’s wealthy for investments in areas like electric cars, solar power, geothermal and wind power. It was restricted to 100 businessmen and women or families whose accumulated wealth amounted to £200m or more and who had made either serious investments in green technology and businesses or a substantial financial commitment to environmental causes. What the newspaper’s impressive list demonstrates definitively is the fact that many of the world’s richest and most powerful entrepreneurs are now embracing environmentalism in a fulsome, wholehearted manner, which could only have been dreamed of a decade ago. To put all this into some perspective, Warren Buffett (worth Euro 37bn) is now regularly swapping places with the rather more high-profile Bill Gates (worth Euro 30bn) at the top of Forbes magazine’s annual list of world

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During the past decade it has become extremely important to optimise all aspects of product design. Competition is tougher than ever and steel costs have skyrocketed. For economic reasons each component must be utilised to its maximum capacity. Bolted joints became the centre of attention after recent findings that they are often used to as little as 30 per cent of their capacity.{pagebreak} Moreover, a failed critical bolted joint could lead to expensive warranty claims or maintenance costs. Control of the clamp load in a bolted joint is vital. However, when faced with a problem joint, it is not surprising that the design engineer will not have an answer if asked about the clamp load. Torque calculations must always be based on the existing conditions that often are very vague. Unless all parameters are correct, the calculation will be unreliable. Examples of parameters are:            Thread condition of the fastenersHardness of contact surfaceMaterial (steel, aluminium, copper, etc.)Extra friction from a locking fastenerExtra friction from an adhesiveLubricant on the threadType

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Considerable wind resources place many countries across the region in an enviable position. Yet capitalising on those resources can prove problematic, due to local planning restrictions. This case study from the UK highlights the problems faced and offers a number of solutions that will resonate with wind energy suppliers throughout Europe.{pagebreak}The UK has enviable wind resources and the potential to become the green powerhouse of Europe, yet lags behind many of its neighbours in its use and development of renewable energy from wind projects. Ambitious targets have been set by the UK Government, which equate to 30% of electricity from renewable energy resources by 2020. Currently however, less than five percent  of electricity comes from renewables, highlighting the major challenges ahead to meet these targets in the next ten years. A number of issues surround the UK’s delay in exploiting its wind energy resources. However, the complex planning systems which are in place have been identified by both the Government and developers as the major obstacle to progress.There are many examples of the planning system failing the renewable, and traditional, energy industry in the UK. The Ray Wind Farm proposal in Northumberland, for example, was the subject of application to

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CN's rail network spans Canada and mid America, from the Atlantic and Pacifc oceans to the Gulf of Mexico. Combined with the railroad's ability to work with connecting rail carriers throughout North America and the fact that CN provides service at more ports than any other North American railroad, CN offers attractive shipping solutions for companies shipping within North America and internationally.{pagebreak}PES: North AmericaCN provides a greener way to ship wind turbine componentsWith wind turbines helping the world shift to a greener energy supply, more and more environmentally conscious manufacturers - and their customers - are interested in utilizing a greener transportation mode to get their winturbines to their destination. CN is in a strong position to support this important emerging market, with a shipping solution that is truly seamless, and a defnite green advantage.Emissions reduction is an integral part of CN's day-to-day activities. The railroad's new EPA Tier 2-compliant locomotives produce approximately 40% less nitrogen oxides than unregulated locomotives and consume up to 20% less fuel. In fact, CN can move one tonne of freight 197 kilometres on just one litre of fuel. Automatic stop/start devices shut locomotives down when they are not in use, and a low-idle feature ensures

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Making wind tower maintenance easier and more efficient, international premium shrinkwrap supplier Dr. Shrink offers its new TowerMinders. Instead of crews using the traditional rope with rags tied around it to stabilize work platforms on towers, they can now utilize this innovative rolling ball system to make the job easier and safer.{pagebreak}TowerMinders eliminates all rope marks and will not damage or mar the surface of the tower. This unique system is comprised of a set of virtually indestructible balls that roll with very little friction. Once threaded onto rugged rope and secured, they effortlessly roll up and down the tower, leaving no damage behind. The balls fit on rope up to 2.5 cm in diameter.Incredibly simple to install, it requires no tools. One TowerMinders set includes 36 balls and 36 15 cm spacers constructed from HDPE. Headquartered in Manistee, Michigan, USA, Dr. Shrink is an international full-service, full-circle supplier of shrinkwrap and accessories. The company's innovative products include vapor corrosion intercept plastic and capsules to prevent corrosion, vents to eliminate mold and mildew and zipper access doors to provide easy access to covered assets.ContactDr. Shrink315 Washington StManisteeMI 49660 USA.Phone: +1-231-723-2685Fax: +1-231-723-9586 drshrink@dr-shrink.comwww.dr-shrink.com 

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London, UK, June 23, 2009 - Ahead of the eighth annual British Wind Energy Association (BWEA) offshore wind event that starts in London tomorrow, the European-based Renewables team of Willis Group Holdings (NYSE:WSH), the global insurance broker, say that insurers are increasingly seeing offshore wind as an attractive investment area with considerable growth potential.{pagebreak}The UK is a world leader in offshore wind energy. With nine offshore projects operational and a further seven currently under construction, the UK will have doubled its wind capacity to 1,500 megawatts by the end of 2009. The UK government's target is to generate up to 20 percent of Britain's electricity from renewables by 2020, 33,000 megawatts of which will come from offshore wind energy. "Offshore wind is a significant opportunity for the insurance industry, with the market expected to grow nearly 30-fold between now and 2020," said Michael Buckle, Executive Director of the Willis Renewables team, part of Willis Global Markets International. "That growth will be driven by some 40 to 50 new wind projects, each with multi-million pound construction premiums. So it is no wonder that insurers are seeing offshore wind as the next big growth area." Despite the growth potential of offshore wind

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Even heavy-duty wind generation equipment needs protection from the elements. Ensuring turbine blades remain in top shape during storage and in transit, international premium shrinkwrap supplier Dr. Shrink introduces the revolutionary Wind Bag.{pagebreak}A blade enclosure system, the company's thick 10 mil shrinkwrap is used to make covers for wind turbine blades, protecting them from weather damage. Available up to 60 meters in length, the Wind Bag is easy to install and apply. Covers to protect blade ends against water and mold damage are also available.Dr. Shrink's thick mil shrinkwrap is constructed from 100% virgin resin and contains maximum UV inhibitors for long-term storage. Unlike tarps, this premium shrinkwrap will not move or chafe surfaces.Dr. Shrink is a full-service, full-circle supplier of premium shrinkwrap and accessories including, vapor corrosion intercept plastic and capsules to prevent corrosion, vents to eliminate mold and mildew and zipper access doors to provide easy access to a covered asset. Environmentally-responsible, the company offers the REBAG® system, a shrinkwrap recycling program available in the US and Canada.Contact Dr. Shrink, 315 Washington St., Manistee, MI 49660 USA. +1-231-723-2685; Fax: +1-231-723-9586. drshrink@dr-shrink.com; www.dr-shrink.com. If you have questions about this press release

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What's happening:BWEA UK Wind Week 2009: 13 - 21st June 2009.The UK's biggest celebration of wind energy takes place over 9 days this June, with over 20 wind farms and supporters opening their doors across the country.{pagebreak}UK Wind Week will be promoting the benefits and opportunities offered by wind energy in terms of sustainability, economic prosperity and energy security.* The UK is the windiest country in Europe - we could power our country several times over using this free fuel. A modern 2.5MW turbine at a reasonable site will generate 6.5 million unites of electricity each year, enough to meet the annual needs of over 1,400 households, make 230 million cups of tea or run a computer for 2,250 years.* Wind energy is the fastest growing source of electricity in the world.* 80% per cent of people in the UK are in support of wind energy, according to official Government surveys~* Together, wind, wave and tidal can supply over 30% of the UK's electricity by 2020, resulting in £70 billion of investment.* The wind, wave and tidal sectors are set to create 60,000 direct jobs in the next decade, up from 5,000 today, providing a major contribution to the EU's

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