Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

We have said this before but how much lighter and more efficient can these heavy lift jack-up vessels get? PES brings you SOUL, the 4th generation of wind turbine installation vessels. After successfully launching their revolutionary heavy lift jack-up vessel design, SOUL-partners, SeaOwls and Ulstein, continued their mission to develop the optimal range of heavy lift jack-up vessels that will enable the offshore wind industry to bring down the cost of renewable energy. Different from the existing third generation fleet of wind turbine installation vessels (WTIVs), the SOUL heavy lift jack-up vessel design was conceived with the actual lifting operation from a stable-up platform, in mind. This design focus resulted in an unmatched heavy lift performance in terms of lifted load, reach and height for a jack-up vessel, when used for either afloat or firmly standing on its four legs. Existing WTIVs are either ‘ships with legs’ or ‘self-propelled jack-up barges’ and both design concepts have their own strengths and weaknesses. Legged ships have limited payload and lifting capacities due to their heavy structures and narrow gaps between portside and starboard legs. Jack-up barges, with propulsion, have their own sailing and seakeeping challenges. SOUL - the fourth generation of wind turbine installation vessels The SOUL

Read More

PES is pleased to share this practical advice on saving time and money, in getting approval for wind farm projects, from Al Maiorino, the President of Public Strategy Group, Inc.,. This is based on his years of experience in successful and varied campaigns throughout the USA and abroad. Renewable project companies have moved light years in the past decade on their ability to educate residents on the benefits of renewable projects. However, there is more work to be done to ensure that wind and other renewable projects do not get entangled in a web of misinformation, and eventually delayed or even defeated. All too often, companies find that every single month a project is delayed, the renewable company loses thousands of dollars. Even a delay of a few weeks is costly, so keeping with a strict entitlement calendar is essential. This month, one such project blocked by the Scottish government was West Coast Energy’s Highland Perthshire wind proposal. The wind farm was in the pipelines for five years and had been scaled back from forty to twenty-five turbines in response to public outcry. The project would have been able to generate enough clean energy to power 40,000 homes and start a community

Read More

Words: Sasaenia P. Oluwabunmi, Kayode E. Oluwabunmi & Athanasios J. Kolios Abstract: The development of adequate energy sources to satisfy the ever increasing energy demand in the world has led to the deployment of several offshore energy installations. Offshore Oil & Gas and renewable energy installations have had a lot of growth in recent years; this growth has led to an increase in the accompanying risks and challenges faced by these industries especially regarding policy implementation. Thus, it is pertinent to assess all the risks in the offshore energy industry, to create a ‘feed-in base’ applicable to both offshore renewables and offshore oil and gas industries. This paper analyses all the risks in the offshore energy industry in relation to policy through Failure Mode and Effects (FMEA) analysis using Risk Prioritisation Numbers (RPNs). 1. Introduction The offshore oil and gas sector generates around £20 billion of revenue per annum and £12.8 billion of Gross Value Added (GVA) whilst supporting induced, indirect and direct employment of more than 190,000 people; thus, making it one of the key sectors of the UK economy [1]. This scenario is true not only for the West but also for major emerging economies; for example, in Nigeria, offshore oil

Read More

Words: Kristian Holm, VP Renewables & Utilities at Kongsberg Digital A typical wind turbine is equipped with a huge number of sensors, signal processors, and other types of monitoring equipment to ensure that it maintains its autonomous operations. These data points provide a myriad of data which can be used to optimise the operation of the turbine, cutting maintenance costs dramatically. Usually, sensor data are used to maintain normal turbine operation. Temperature sensors reduce or stop the wind turbine if the oil temperature in the gearbox exceeds a set permissible limit. Vibration sensors stop the turbine if the vibrations surpass a set permissible limit. However, these sensors do not simply maintain operations; they add a host of other options to the wind turbine, and these can be used for operational excellence. Did you know that in less than a second a single wind turbine can forward up to 1500 data signals that provide information about the turbine status? If you are really smart, you’ll use this information to define the current condition of the turbine. And if you are really, really smart, you’ll use it to predict the future condition or the remaining useful life of the turbine. Moreover, since wind turbines hold

Read More

A PES exclusive from Steve Sawyer, GWEC Secretary General. This is his perspective on the options for a world using 100% renewable energy, based on research and years of experience in our industry. Ever since the oil shocks of the 1970s, and the early emergence of commercial wind turbines, solar hot water heaters, and the first solar PV panels, there has been speculation about what it would take to completely wean ourselves from fossil fuels. As far back as 1975 Danish physicist Bent Sørensen published a paper looking at a 100% renewable energy system for Denmark1. The visionary Dr. Amory Lovins came up with the term ‘soft energy path’ in 1976 to describe a future where energy efficiency and renewables gradually replace a centralized energy system based on fossil fuels and nuclear power. After the emergence of the threat of human-induced climate change in the late 1980s, the discussion got a bit more serious. Both solar and wind technologies had progressed somewhat during the intervening decade and a half, but were still expensive and small. The first fossil fuel free energy scenario was published by Greenpeace and the Stockholm Environmental Institute in 19932. But not even the most enthusiastic advocates of renewables would have

Read More

Bjond’s key word is innovation and their engineers are experts with a passion for complexity. Jo van Montfort, Sr Consultant, Director at Bjond tells PES about the short comings in the offshore wind industry, with regards to corrosion and how they want to change this. He says key factors include collaboration across the industry to collect the necessary data and a change in the testing requirements. It’s an interesting read with the potential for real savings. Let’s look at the challenges facing the offshore industry when it comes to protecting a steel structure in this type of environment. The first thing to be aware of is formulated perfectly by John Craven: ‘All my students know how to respond to the question ‘What happens when you use land-based technology in the ocean?’ They learn from day one to answer in unison: ‘You die’1. We as experts would add to the following: The annual global impact of corrosion is estimated at $2.2 trillion and represents about 3% of the worlds’ GDP. The WCO (World Corrosion Organisation) concludes that 25% to 30% of annual corrosion costs could be saved, if optimum corrosion management practices were employed and knowledge put in to practice. This is exactly where Bjond is

Read More

A typical wind turbine is equipped with a huge number of sensors, signal processors, and other types of monitoring equipment to ensure that it maintains its autonomous operations. These data points provide a myriad of data which can be used to optimise the operation of the turbine, cutting maintenance costs dramatically. Usually, sensor data are used to maintain normal turbine operation. Temperature sensors reduce or stop the wind turbine if the oil temperature in the gearbox exceeds a set permissible limit. Vibration sensors stop the turbine if the vibrations surpass a set permissible limit. However, these sensors do not simply maintain operations; they add a host of other options to the wind turbine, and these can be used for operational excellence. Did you know that in less than a second a single wind turbine can forward up to 1500 data signals that provide information about the turbine status? If you are really smart, you’ll use this information to define the current condition of the turbine. And if you are really, really smart, you’ll use it to predict the future condition or the remaining useful life of the turbine. Moreover, since wind turbines hold all this information, they are perfectly equipped for

Read More

Our industry is ever changing and the increase in size, height, length and weight of the new foundations and turbines have created a need for new lifting equipment able to handle these loads. PES is pleased to bring you an innovative solution from GustoMSC, who will be able to assure deliveries and installations to the new mega sites. Introduction Offshore wind turbines are predominantly installed in five steps: Tower in one single lift, nacelle in a single lift and then the three blades separately. Most modern, purpose built wind turbine installation vessels are capable of lifting the current 6-8 MW turbines, reaching the necessary height and have sufficient variable load and deck space to carry an economically efficient number of turbines for each round trip. However, over the last few years, the turbine installation market for the 6-8 MW range has been characterised by low installation volumes and vessel overcapacity. Adding the introduction of the new generation turbines with the challenge of installing higher and heavier wind turbine components, these are challenging times for installation contractors. GustoMSC has been cooperating closely with the offshore wind installation contractors and has provided integrated and efficient installation technology to face these challenges. Both floating and Jack-up technologies are

Read More

The development of appropriate logistic concepts is a key factor for an economically successful offshore wind park. In the past the analysis and optimisation of these concepts have mostly focused on either the logistics for transport & installation (T&I) or operation and maintenance (O&M). Less attention has been paid to the important phase of commissioning. Yet it is this phase which is decisive for the rapid connection of the wind turbines and the feeding of their wind electricity into the grid. The commissioning process takes up much more time than the actual installation of the wind turbine. The various process workflows, the ships used, and the operating limits mean the installation and commissioning processes often diverge (Figure 3). A logistics concept must therefore optimize its resources paying due consideration to the weather risks in order to minimize this divergence. Methods used to analyse the weather risks In the COAST research project funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy, the WaTSS – Weather Time Series Scheduling method – was developed at Fraunhofer IWES, together with partners from industry and implemented into the COAST – Comprehensive Offshore Analysis and Simulation Tool – software. The COAST software computes the weather risk of

Read More

Testing has been the name of the game for a while now. In the long run research design and testing helps save time and keep costs down. PES finds out first-hand how this worked for Damen, who turned to Maritime Research Institute Netherlands (MARIN) to test its pioneering Service Operations Vessel (SOV), together with the vessel’s Dynamic Positioning system and its walk-to-work telescopic gangway. The Damen SOV is purpose built for the transfer and accommodation of offshore personnel and the ground breaking design guarantees fast, safe and comfortable access to wind turbines. The first vessel of this type, the Bibby WaveMaster 1, is expected to be available from end-August 2017. Representing more than 4 years of Research and Development, the new SOV design underwent its initial seakeeping tests at MARIN’s Offshore Basin in Wageningen in the Netherlands to examine its DP capabilities during the turbine approach. Damen also asked MARIN to assess the power management system and the gangway through numerical simulations. The project resulted in an integrated HIL simulator, which has now been installed at Damen’s headquarters. Jorinus Kalis, Manager Development, R&D at Damen explains: ‘Given that this was a completely new design, we wanted to test the vessel itself, but also

Read More