Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

Words: Leonardo Gómez, Engineering Manager at TSR Wind PES is excited to introduce TSR, a small Spanish engineering company that has developed technology through R&D, to provide affordable services that can compete in price, with traditional methods in the wind energy sector, solving problems that historically, would have involved risks, non-competitive stopping times and an increase in operating personnel. With the growing number of wind turbines soon to be operating out of warranty, more frequent, minimal risk, effective and affordable services are a necessity in the industry. Maintenance often conflicts with tight budgets and down times but at the same time, high performance rates are expected from the windfarms, where one of the more critical factors is the inspection and repairing of the blades TSR conceived its magnetic coupling robots for wind turbine maintenance, as a solution to minimise cost, reduce risks and obtain better results. The development started with the idea of a climbing, cleaning robot and has evolved into a series of different models of robots, according to the service it provides. The first ones on offer to the public were the EOLOS series, a type of robot specifically designed for blade inspections. TSR entered the international market with the robotic

Read More

While performing service and maintenance on wind energy plants, employees routinely work at great heights. Fall protection is therefore a requirement for them. They use climbing protection equipment when climbing the towers. When it comes to work safety, leading manufacturers are increasingly involving users in the development of new solutions. Collaboration between Siemens Gamesa, the manufacturer SKYLOTEC, and the supplier ICM Safety shows how this works successfully. The ’Claw’ cable runner for steel ropes is a solution that simplifies use and reduces the risk of accident. With around 27,000 employees on five continents, Siemens Gamesa is one of the leading providers in the renewable energy industry. The company provides service and maintenance for 23,000 turbines around the world. They monitor more than 3,000 onshore and offshore facilities in Great Britain and Ireland alone. Fall protection is required for employees while they perform service and maintenance work on wind power systems. This does not just apply to when they are working high up, on the turbine. In many cases, Siemens Gamesa employees reach the turbine by means of a climbing protection system that is installed within the tower. This consists of a rigid anchor line, such as a steel rope or rail and

Read More

Safety is of paramount importance when working at the dizzy height of a wind turbine. Brad Prickett, the senior lubrication engineer at ExxonMobil Fuels & Lubricants, located in Houston, gives PES his insight on how this can be improved. This is his area of expertise as he has worked with wind turbine operators since the mid-2000s. When it comes to the safety of your wind turbine operation, lubrication can have a bigger impact than you might think. That’s because the greatest safety risks to an operation typically occur during equipment servicing and maintenance. Take, for example, a routine oil change. What is a fairly straightforward process for ground-based equipment becomes much more complex for wind turbine equipment, as maintenance teams must ascend the tower, sometimes to elevations as high as 400 feet, before carefully inspecting the equipment to determine if any additional servicing is needed before refilling components with the new oil. This is no easy task, which is why one of the most effective opportunities to enhance the safety of a wind turbine operation is by reducing human-machine interaction (HMI), or the frequency which maintenance personnel interact with wind turbine equipment. Reducing HMIs requires having a robust lubrication program that prevents unnecessary downtime and

Read More

PES brings you Jan De Nul’s experience of constructing the Tahkoluoto wind farm. The geographical location, the elements and the difficult terrain all posed different types of challenges. Previous knowledge gained on other ventures, suitable equipment and engineering skills were crucial to the success of this project. Possible ice and rocky soil: these were the conditions in which Jan De Nul Group installed the very first Finnish Offshore Wind Farm, Tahkoluoto. It is named after the port nearby, meaning ‘islet of the grindstones.’ In fact it was hard diabase bedrock below the seabed and a layer of moraine clay and boulders of different sizes on top of it. Being the remains of scraping glaciers in previous glaciation periods, it was a challenging environment in which to construct a wind farm, able to withstand the severe Finnish winters. None of the classical monopile driving methods, such as the one Jan De Nul Group used to construct the Belgian offshore wind farm Nobelwind, could be used here, in the Gulf of Bothnia, because of the soil conditions. An atypical design and construction of the wind turbine foundations was necessary. The only option was to place ballasted foundations on a prepared seabed. This was certainly no practice

Read More

Auctions are becoming the standard instrument for granting state support in almost all European markets. In economic terms, this is the right step to take as it subjects renewables to market forces and rewards the most efficient projects. This was evident in the latest UK Government Contract for Difference (CfD) auction round, designed to support renewable energy projects being delivered in UK waters. One of the winners in the latest CfD auction round, September 2017, was innogy’s Triton Knoll offshore wind farm, located off England’s east coast. PES invited Richard Sandford, innogy Director of Offshore Investment & Asset Management, to give us an insight into this offshore project. ‘Triton Knoll’s auction success confirms the excellent work we have done in recent years, and proved that we can successfully hold our own in a very competitive market environment,’ Richard said. ‘Thanks to our extensive know-how in the development as well as the construction and operation of complex offshore projects, as well as our varied research and development activities we have succeeded in further reducing the costs for offshore wind energy in the UK.’ The industry pulling together to reduce costs and drive innovation innogy’s 860 megawatt Triton Knoll offshore project was allocated a CfD

Read More

Words: Wouter Slob, Tender & Concepts Engineer, Huisman, the Netherlands The development of current and future offshore wind farms is picking up with wind installation contractors further optimising their toolboxes for efficient installation of offshore wind turbines. Up to now the jack-up vessel has been the platform of choice for installation of wind turbines; providing a stable platform, which when jacked up, uses a crane which reaches high enough to install the nacelle of the wind turbines. Building larger size jack-ups is a costly affair; the Foldable Offshore Crane offers a crane solution, which can increase the installation capabilities of such an asset, offering the same effective lift height with a shorter crane, compared to conventional fixed boom cranes while increasing the payload capacity. With the ever increasing size of wind turbines and the need to make efficient use of the stable platform provided by jack-up vessels, it is invaluable to be able to increase the lifting envelope of the crane, both in height, width and load. This can result in a vessel layout on which a crane boom extends far beyond the main vessel dimensions. In this setup the boom is largely unsupported during transit conditions, resulting in unwanted fatigue wear. The

Read More

Words: Matthias Brandt, Board Director, Deutsche Windtechnik The global wind energy market has always been subject to constant change, but it has rarely changed as rapidly as it is right now. Political realities are evolving, and they are forcing the market to produce results based on one clear objective: absolute cost reduction. Increasing cost pressure is forcing market participants to take action In 2025, the first German offshore wind farms will be connected to the grid without the benefit of any subsidies whatsoever. In Spain, the remuneration of 4.3 cents for onshore wind is shaking up everything that was considered to be reliable up till now. The last onshore tender also put Germany at 4.45 cents. The continuous acquisitions within the industry are creating new structures. In order to maintain or even increase their competitiveness, the various market participants need to work together closely. This also applies to the heterogeneous market for maintenance. The European wind energy markets differ from each other in many respects. Economic conditions and national political frameworks directly affect and control wind energy. In Spain, for example, subsidisation has been withdrawn entirely. This means that the wind energy market conditions here are completely different than in Germany. In turn, the Spanish

Read More

PES is excited to introduce TSR, a small Spanish engineering company that has developed technology through R&D, to provide affordable services that can compete in price, with traditional methods in the wind energy sector, solving problems that historically, would have involved risks, non-competitive stopping times and an increase in operating personnel. With the growing number of wind turbines soon to be operating out of warranty, more frequent, minimal risk, effective and affordable services are a necessity in the industry. Maintenance often conflicts with tight budgets and down times but at the same time, high performance rates are expected from the windfarms, where one of the more critical factors is the inspection and repairing of the blades TSR conceived its magnetic coupling robots for wind turbine maintenance, as a solution to minimise cost, reduce risks and obtain better results. The development started with the idea of a climbing, cleaning robot and has evolved into a series of different models of robots, according to the service it provides. The first ones on offer to the public were the EOLOS series, a type of robot specifically designed for blade inspections. TSR entered the international market with the robotic platforms from EOLOS series, a guided

Read More

It’s an exciting time at the Port of Rotterdam. It already has a flourishing business network and is set to get even bigger with the development of the Offshore Center Maasvlakte 2. Joost Eenhuizen, Business Manager, Port of Rotterdam Authority, provides PES with a look in to the future at this unique project in Europe. The ambition of the Port of Rotterdam Authority is to be a world leader in the field of sustainability. The goal is greener industry and logistics, which will improve and maintain the environmental quality. The use of alternative energy supplies such as wind, solar and biomass is increasing so as to provide a viable alternative to fossil fuels. It’s in the Port of Rotterdam’s (PoR) DNA to look ahead and plan new developments. Two new markets, offshore wind and decommissioning are now firmly in sight due to this new venture. The Oil & Gas industry will also benefit from the improvement and expansion of the already good port capabilities. The development of the ‘Offshore Center’ didn’t just happen. It has come after years of thorough research and hundreds of various discussions with different offshore companies, in order to ascertain the needs associated with such big expansion. This ensures

Read More