Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

Online trade is the big winner of the Corona crisis. This also applies to the spare parts and repair market for wind turbines. A Hamburg company, a pioneer in this niche in 2013, is now gaining momentum despite, or because of Corona. Stefan Weber, Founder and Managing Director of Windsourcing.com GmbH, shares his thoughts with PES on how the foundation of a digital trading company came about and how much more importance digitization has gained among the broad masses in the context of the Corona crisis. I am an Amazon fan. Please do not misunderstand me. It is completely unacceptable not to pay sales tax from Asian suppliers in Germany and to pay little if any company tax at all. No, I am a fan of focusing on the customers and their benefits: the punctual and fast delivery and using the distribution channel Internet. This enthusiasm has driven me already in 2013 when I founded Windsourcing.com. It was clear to me that digitalization does not stop at renewable energies and here the industry and the entire energy industry can learn a lot from Amazon and Co. Prior to the foundation of the company, I had already been working for many years

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If a leopard could not change its spots, it would have long been extinct had it been masquerading as a vessel owner in the offshore industry! ‘It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change.’ —Charles Darwin An inability to adapt to changing surroundings has repeatedly been the downfall of those incapable of moving forward. You only need to look at companies such as Kodak and Blockbuster to see what can happen if you are unable or too slow to embrace change. Bringing things closer to home, shipping in general and offshore specifically has been hard hit over the past few years by a sustained oil-price crash, compounded by the current global COVID-19 pandemic. These events have shone a critical light on not just the way we do business, but on life as we know it – and this is not said lightly. The devastation from the pandemic has already left its mark on hundreds of thousands of individuals and families, whilst the economic fallout from the current crisis will be deep, far-reaching and undoubtedly leave many casualties in its wake. Change is definitely on

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With the increasing trend toward cleaner energy sources, offshore wind technology plays a vital role in supporting the global transition to renewable energy. Development of shallow water locations is increasing in volume and pace, with the industry moving toward the more substantive wind energy resources that are found offshore in deeper waters, through the application and development of floating offshore platform technologies. By 2025, it is anticipated that close to 20,000 turbines with 250 plus offshore substations will have been installed offshore. Even with the development of larger turbines, these quantities are expected to increase by a factor of three plus by 2050*. Critical to their successful operation are the subsea power cables that have the essential function of transmitting generated power from the turbines to the substations (electric hub of the windfarm), and then onward to shore. Digitization in renewable energy Digital technology development continues at a rapid pace, increasing in functionality and accessibility, while supporting gains in productivity, efficiency, visibility, and informed decision making. With growing competition in renewable energy markets and ever more remote and demanding deep-water conditions, the renewables industry is looking at advanced digital solutions to enable new efficiencies and maximize return on investment. The continued

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Anyone familiar with the current offshore wind (OSW) project pipeline along the United States’ East Coast, knows that this undertaking has great potential to turn into the envisioned one trillion-dollar industry in the coming decades. The current plan is to install 13 offshore wind farms totaling 9.1GW power output by 2026 [AWEA Status Update 2020], with industry experts predicting to overtake the European market 20 years from now. This ambitious project poses an immense challenge, but also a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for the entire American waterfront. Are we ready to handle the world’s largest offshore wind turbines, and how can we bridge existing gaps between industry expectations and currently available cabotage compliant solutions? Lessons learned from the existing U.S. onshore wind industry can help us to provide the skillsets necessary. Today we hear from SEA.O.G. Offshore about their perspective on OSW’s future in the U.S. and their plan to use onshore industry experience to move offshore wind forward. From onshore to offshore With more than 60,000 onshore turbines planted across 41 states, wind has already become the most significant renewable energy source in the United States. As of January 2020, the total installed wind power nameplate generating capacity in the United

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With the world engaged in the energy transition and the environmental sustainability high on business agendas, scientists and governments are working to identify alternative technologies that will generate enough energy to meet the growing demand while reducing greenhouse emissions. The wind sector and the energy transition Within the transition trend, there is a wide portfolio of alternative energy sources available, from a large-scale development of hydrogen as a clean fuel, to renewable energy such as solar or wind power.  Offshore wind is considered as one of the fastest growing energy industries, with 2019 being the biggest growth year to date, and has the potential to create as many as 77,000 jobs within the industry on a global scale. The importance of a workforce According to the recent Global Wind Organisation (GWO) and Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) report, as the offshore wind industry continues to thrive despite the impacts of COVID-19, we will see not only a substantial growth of the industry, but also the emergence of new markets, offering further opportunities in the sector. In order to secure a healthy long-term growth and the necessary degree of sustainability of the sector, it is crucial that there is a skilled workforce available, able to support the industry’s ambitions and

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The daughter craft for wind farms far from shore Over the last three years we have seen the introduction of purpose-built Service Offshore Vessels (SOV). These 70-100 m long vessels service wind farms, where a long distance to shore makes a land-based service organization impractical. Typically, 40-60 technicians live onboard the vessels and are transferred to the wind turbines with motion compensated walk-to-work gangways. A challenge for this operation is the efficiency of getting the technicians around the wind farm. The SOV transits at typically 10 knots and needs time for accurate positioning, to set out and also collect the personnel. This is the background for using daughter craft. Deployed and retrieved by a davit system onboard the SOV, she can complement the gangway, shuttle between the SOV and turbines near and far throughout the wind farm. So far these daughter craft have been of similar type to existing small rescue crafts. Monohull, 10-12 m in length and weight 8-15 tons. But these small vessels can transfer to the turbines in limited wave height, typically up to 1 to 1.2 m significant wave height and will therefore get limited weather windows. An alternative is to use larger Crew Transfer Vessels (CTV) of

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Although being versatile is not a goal on its own, it does pay off to be able to meet the ever-changing requirements of the offshore market. The saying ‘the best laid plans of mice and men often go awry’ is confirmed in the offshore market on a daily basis. Working around these changes of plan can be difficult and may even push your assets to the limits of their capabilities. This is where ELA Container Offshore is able to alleviate the stress, using their highly versatile fleet of container modules. Whether you need additional storage facilities onboard your offshore assets, or you are looking to add workstations, office areas or even living quarters, ELA is able to assist. The offshore modules are available ex-stock and are suitable for deployment in any offshore environment, on both fixed- and mobile assets. The challenge In order to complete projects in the offshore environment, it is critical to ensure availability of all tools, resources and equipment onsite. These projects can involve a wide array of assets, ranging from offshore platforms to wind-turbines and vessels of any shape and size, but also includes monitoring stations, transmission towers and any other installation at, or below sea level. Containers

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Newly developed ground-based winch system shortens the amount of time needed to replace large components When a large component of a wind turbine fails, the operator often has no other choice but to have the damaged component replaced. This often involves a considerable amount of organisational work and financial expense – not just for the spare part itself but also for the logistics and infrastructure required to carry out the replacement. The loss of income due to system downtime also has a significant impact. The service provider GFW, a subsidiary of Deutsche Windtechnik, has developed a new ground-based winch system (GBWS for short) for replacing large components that can save tens or even hundreds of thousands of euros. Using the laws of nature for specific purposes The GBWS’s intelligent system of pulling and weight mechanisms makes the use of large cranes and the modification of local infrastructure that goes along with it unnecessary. The heart of the GBWS consists of load winches, support winches, support frames, counterweights and a control system. After the support frame has been securely set up on a suitable surface, the load ropes are pulled to the hub of the wind turbine. Depending on the type of large component

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New PV technologies make it possible to create more diversity to the utilization of solar energy. High efficiency, low cost and good looks of PV applications make it feasible to integrate solar power to new products and environments. Any self-powering object creates a local energy source. Solar energy can be used in many building integrated PV (BIPV) applications, such as facades, window structures or balconies. All vehicles are potential producers of solar energy. In principle, any energy-requiring object under the sun could produce PV power. Integrating PV can bring new value-adding features to products or even create completely new products. Producing local off-the-grid power will be the future. Now, is the time to redefine solar technology and make it a natural part of the environment. Valoe´s integrated solar technology meets new challenges There are no off-the-shelf products for integrated PV applications. The traditional cell and module designs cannot meet the various demands that the integrated PV will face. If PV is integrated into vehicles (VIPV), they need to survive vibration and to be shock and wear resistant. The weight of the module needs to be as light as possible and the PV element must be flexible and adjust to the surface form. Survivability,

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Well aware that global energy challenges are changing rapidly, at Studer we are focusing on creating simple solutions to complex problems. Access to electricity for all, the energy transition, automation, digitalization and electric mobility are all topics and issues that set the pace and influence the creation of all our products and services. In energy management the needs are increasing, systems are becoming more complex, and technology and innovation must respond to these new imperatives. We develop products that enrich peoples’ lives and are constantly on the lookout for groundbreaking developments and trends. A few years ago, a battery inverter was a single device working alone. Today, it communicates with other devices in a system, there is remote supervision, an interaction with the end user and the rest of the elements in the energy chain. There is real added value in having an eco-system around the inverter. Studer service does not end when a product is placed on the market, on the contrary, it goes one step more, committing itself to constant development, with a team of specialized professionals fully dedicated to this. Innovation is essential and it is not just about creating the next range of new products, but also about improving existing products

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