Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

Steve Sawyer, Secretary General, GWEC, gives a global overview of wind power during 2015, a very positive year culminating in the Paris agreement in December. He predicts a steady growth in the industry over the next five years. Wind Power Leads All New Power Generation More than 150 nations gathered in New York, on Earth Day, to formally sign the landmark climate change deal which was agreed in Paris last December, an all too rare triumph for multilateralism in a world that desperately needed one. Outgoing UNFCCC head Christiana Figueres, just named one of Time Magazine’s most influential 100 people in 2015, has predicted that the treaty will enter into force no later than 2018, two years ahead of schedule. We need the extra time. While there are many positive signs, Mother Nature is sending signals of another sort: weird weather, droughts, floods, unprecedented Arctic sea-ice retreat, record high winter temperatures and Greenland’s annual glacier melt season started two months early. CO2 levels are rising at an alarming rate and we are now in uncharted territory in terms of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, at least since Homo sapiens have been around.

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We look at the European Wind Energy Association (EWEA)’s view of the future energy landscape beyond 2020. Current targets set out for 2030 in Europe will see the wind energy sector and other renewable technologies transform the power sector and bring positive impacts to the European power system and the economy as we pivot towards the new normal of renewable energy becoming our main source of electricity. As targets set in Brussels call for renewables to make up at least 27% of energy consumed, Giles Dickson, Chief Executive Officer of the European Wind Energy Association invites policy makers to go beyond the bare minimum. In their report ‘Aiming High’ published in February 2016, the EWEA examines the extra rewards of taking a more progressive view as a reminder to policy makers of the opportunity that wind energy presents. We provide a summary of the report here. With 392 GW installed, wind energy can be the single largest source of power generation in the EU by 2030 ahead of coal and gas. Wind energy already plays a significant role in the European power sector. In 2014, the wind industry installed 11,791 MW in the EU – more than gas and coal combined. Today wind

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Following hot on the heels of Hamburg we turn our attention to the eagerly anticipated Offshore Energy Amsterdam. Here is our preview, just for you. The international oil, gas and renewable trade event is just around the corner and before it kicks off, the Offshore WIND Conference (OWC) will take center stage. OWC will again be part of OEEC, taking place on 24 and 25 October also at the Amsterdam RAI, together with speakers from leading companies such as DONG, Siemens and Vattenfall, to further strengthen OEECs connection to renewables. During OWC speakers from the industry will discuss how more business opportunities can be found and how the industry can reach its potential. One such company is Smulders. The company built the first foundation for an offshore wind farm in 2001 and is about to deliver its 1,500th foundation. Having that experience means knowing not all projects will be developed as planned, so Smulders scrutinises all the planned projects prior to bidding to work on them. “My responsibility is to capitalise on this knowledge and really look to specific projects which we can follow and hopefully be awarded within next couple of years. At the moment, that means keeping an eye on

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Words: Stephen Holden, Maintenance Account Director, Global Marine Systems Limited Although there have been power cables in the marine environment for many decades, there have been relatively few in number until fairly recently. Those that exist are predominately national or short haul international cables and in terms of total kilometres are rather limited. Certainly this is the case when compared with telecoms cables, which have traditionally numbered hundreds of thousands of kilometres laid on the sea bed. As a result, the repair of power cables has very much been a niche market revolving around securing and mobilising VOOs (vessels of opportunity) or framework agreements, the latter mostly with the original cable installer/manufacturer and their specialist repair assets. The financing of these repairs has always rested with the insurance industry, which because of the relative limited number of cables and faults, has been a model that has proved suitable for the majority of parties. However, with increasing awareness of climate change and the subsequent desire for more renewable and cleaner power sources, there has been a big push (particularly in the European region) for the development of large amounts of offshore wind capacity. This has led to a significant increase in power cable sea

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Words: Petri Aho, Senior Vice President, Service Sales EMEA & APAC. This year Moventas launched a new suite of services called Extra Life. Extra Life suites incorporate gearbox services for the most popular, aging fleets, namely GE, Siemens and kilowatt class turbines. By removing known failure modes and replacing them with core Moventas technologies, gearbox lifetime can be extended considerably. Alongside developing the wind industry’s most advanced new gearbox technology, we also wanted to focus on older, existing fleets. With 35 years of experience in wind gearboxes and another 40+ in industrial power transmission, this was fairly easy. All we needed to do was put all the knowledge of gearbox behaviour and typical failures, into service packages for the most popular fleets in Europe and in the US. Extra Life services cover replacements, factory service, plug & play accessories, up-tower services, spares and inspections. Ageing gearboxes can be improved One of the reasons we think the Extra Life concept is great, apart from that there is clear customer demand, is the fact that sustaining existing machinery for as long as we can is, well, sustainable. That’s the kind of industry we want to promote. Unless the turbine itself is decommissioned for some other reason, at

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Words: Thomas Arnold, Team Leader Measurements and Technical Testing for Wind Energy Turbines, TÜV SÜD Industrie Service GmbH Treading a path to and from the filing cabinet is all part of the daily routine of many wind farm owners and operators. Many details of the condition of their wind farm can only be found there. Are there any defects or faults that need to be remedied? Are there any necessary repairs, servicing and maintenance activities? Standardisation and digitisation save time and reduce errors, particularly for large wind turbine portfolios. Processing the vast number of documents created and managed during the operation of wind energy turbines can prove quite a challenge. Most licences, invoices, maintenance, repairs and test reports are sent out as hard copies by standard mail or are emailed as PDF files. As these formats all lack interfaces and export functions, the opportunities for processing them effectively and efficiently are very limited. Before experts can analyse the data in these documents, prioritise activities and initiate work to be performed on the turbine, they often have to laboriously export the documents to other EDP systems and convert them into other file formats e.g. Excel. The information needed for operation is thus rarely centrally

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Words: Kim Mørk, Executive Vice President of Renewables Certification, DNV GL Energy The wind power industry has changed massively over the last 10-15 years. New concepts, technologies and devices have arisen and certification has played an essential role in bringing these developments to market. But today the wind industry is much more mature, and the pioneering projects of the early days have now been operating effectively for many years. So it’s time to ask: does the wind energy industry still need certification? Predicting the future of the certification market is no easy task. The energy industry is constantly evolving and so the certification market has to evolve to support it. For example, 15 years ago renewables certification essentially consisted of type certification; there was almost no demand for project certification. Now, project certification makes up around half of the market. In that time, certification has supported technical innovation by improving the reliability of both products and projects. For wind power, like other renewables sectors, this has led to huge improvements in processes and technologies – boosting performance, quality and reliability of wind power assets. Now that the industry has reached maturity, the question arises: Is certification still relevant?

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PES brings you a preview from the leading international wind energy expo, which expects more than 1,200 exhibitors. It is the largest international business platform onshore and offshore and reflects the global market and the whole of the value chain. It is the meeting point for decision makers from all parts of the world. Hopefully you will come and see us at our booth. WindEnergy Hamburg, the world’s leading expo for wind energy, will be held from 27 to 30 September 2016. Following the successful premiere in 2014, the Hamburg Fair site will again be the meeting point for decision makers in the energy business from all parts of the world. WindEnergy Hamburg covers the whole value chain of both the onshore and offshore wind industry, and is expanding this year, with an additional exhibition hall. Some 1,200 exhibitors will be presenting their innovations on some 65,000 square metres, in a total of nine exhibition halls. This global expo will be opened by its patron Sigmar Gabriel, Germany’s Minister of Economics. This year, for the first time, the WindEurope Conference will be held in parallel to WindEnergy Hamburg. “WindEnergy Hamburg gives the industry the ideal platform to prepare international business and close

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In the late 1990s, Hermann Albers, president of the German Wind Energy Association, was already pointing out that existing networks would not manage to accommodate the growing supply of green power. “Instead of taking action, grid operators began new planning, much too late because they didn’t believe in the success of renewables”, he frequently complained. In early 2005, Albers could feel that his complaints were vindicated. At that time, the semi-public German Energy Agency published its first study of the power grid, citing a figure which generated great interest and was highly criticised. For Germany to achieve a 20 percent share of green energy in its gross electricity consumption by the end of 2020 – a goal that the wind industry saw as much too low – an additional 1,250 kilometres of high-voltage lines alone would have to be installed by that time. The looming dilemma in grid expansion even called politicians into action, albeit with delay. Germany’s Power Grid Expansion Act (EnLAG) entered into force in the summer of 2009. It was supposed to accelerate 24 really important new projects to build an overall volume of slightly more than 1,800 kilometres of high-voltage lines. But by the end of 2015, only 614 kilometres had

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Micro grids are having a big impact on remote areas of the world. Romina Arcamone Garcia, Market Manager, Renewable Energy & Backup Power at Trojan Battery Co., LLC explains to PES how 24/7 energy is now possible in these areas. The establishment of off-grid networks, also known as mini grids or micro grids, around the world is increasing as a way to supply power to remote towns, villages and areas that are not connected to the main electric grid, or only have access to electricity a few hours a day. Battery-based microgrid systems ensure that these areas have access to energy 24/7, enabling remote communities to operate lighting, communications, radios, TV and other electrical equipment. Access to these types of devices, play a vital role in enhancing productivity of local businesses and foster the development of commercial activities in developing regions of the world. In addition, battery-based installations reduce operating costs which diesel-powered installations face such as the rising costs of fuel consumption, fuel transportation, and maintenance of diesel generators. Off-grid photovoltaic (PV) networks have unique power storage requirements due to the varying levels of irradiance, temperature and sun hours available at a particular location. Deep-cycle batteries are key components in PV applications to

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