Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

Words: Gerry Lalonde, CEO, Orenda Energy Solutions. Planning consent is still grey area for the small/medium wind turbine market and it is about time we had consistency and predictability rather than disparate decision making that often blights and inhibits progress across the UK. It has been known for years that planning authorities decision making varies depending on location and geography which might make anyone but the most determined user look at other renewable schemes that offer an easier pathway to energy self-sufficiency, when wind energy ticks many boxes in terms of its appeal – grid friendly with no grid structure required, unobtrusive, as well as offering revenue and investment opportunities. In my view, that’s why we need to shake off the planning shackles because, as the energy industry in the UK continues to evolve, small/medium wind can be pivotal as the ‘driver’ as the scheme of choice particularly for farmers and private landowners. Turbines at this level, around the sub-50kW mark, are vital to maintain this continuous drive to underpin the UK’s small-scale renewable needs. Even the Chief Executive of the National Grid, Steve Holliday, was on record in a recent interview stating that ‘’by 2020 small-scale, distributed generation will represent a third

Read More

In February 2015, the Indian government announced its plans to almost quadruple its renewable power capacity to 175 GW by 2022 as part of the plan to supply electricity to every household in the country. This includes 60 GW from wind energy. Further, India made a commitment at COP21 to raise the share of non-fossil-fuel power capacity in the country’s power mix to 40% by 2030. Consequently, these plans and targets make the Indian market a unique fast moving and growing market where competitive companies can have great business opportunities. But, they also come with a complex and unstable legal framework where manufacturers find many obstacles on the way. Market developments In 2016, India set a national record with 3,612 MW of new installations, bringing the country’s total to 28,700 MW and consolidating its 4th position in the cumulative global rankings, according to the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) of India. India was among the top 10 countries in terms of renewable energy investment, according to UNEP & Bloomberg New Energy Finance. Also, India’s renewable energy sector held its position at the third spot for the second year in a row in the Renewable Energy Country Attractiveness Index (RECAI) released by

Read More

The world of high-pressure hydraulics is constantly in motion. Within this dynamic the Dutch hydraulics specialist Holmatro is continuously developing high-quality solutions for industrial applications. After more than 50 years’ experience as a supplier to the shipbuilding and oil & gas industries, Holmatro developed the first TP levelling set in 2009, used in the construction of the Belgian offshore wind farm Belwind. The set proved to be so successful that they were also used during the construction of subsequent offshore wind farm projects, such as Walney, London Array, Westermost Rough, Dudgeon and many more. Since the introduction of the TP levelling set in 2009, Holmatro has significantly expanded its product range for offshore wind applications. Besides hydraulic solutions to level wind turbine foundations, the company has proven itself in the field of TP fixation, jacket fixation, cutting applications, seafastening equipment and skidding solutions. Holmatro tools are also used for the lifting, weighing and levelling of offshore platforms, the calibration of tension-leg platform (TLP) load cells and are integrated on pipe-laying vessels to support heavy lifting and moving applications. Wind turbine foundations consist of two large steel structures: a monopile (MP) that is driven into the seabed and a transition piece (TP) that

Read More

The American Wind Energy Association is heading back to the U.S. which has championed the wind energy industry for decades for WINDPOWER®. PES brings you the latest information on this unmissable event. If you are invested in U.S. wind energy or looking to enter the market, AWEA WINDPOWER 2017 Conference & Exhibition is the place you need to be. It is where professionals from across the globe find top-tier speakers, world-class education, cutting edge technology, and premium networking. This complete conference experience cannot be found anywhere else. Attend WINDPOWER is mainstream. WINDPOWER is big league, and AWEA WINDPOWER Conference & Exhibition is where new opportunities are waiting to be discovered. By meeting face-to-face with thousands of industry professionals, developing relationships with leading wind energy companies, exploring potential with new or growing small businesses, and participating in forward-thinking sessions, you will find anyhting you need at the largest annual conference for the U.S. wind energy industry. Join over 7,000 wind industry professionals May 22-25 in Anaheim, California at the largest annual wind energy conference in North America. Given the industry’s growth in 2016, AWEA expects this year’s event to be another significant opportunity for garnering relationships and developing business.

Read More

The renewables market, particularly wind, is a key sector for ALE. Building on experience in the power sector, we have used our knowledge and expertise to develop smarter solutions to the challenges created by the increasing heights of wind turbines and associated components. In relation to the on-shore wind enery market, ALE offers a bespoke Transport, Crane and Installation (TCI) package for the wind energy sector. The transportation phases of projects include route assessments, liaising with local authorities, providing specialist transportation equipment and facilitating the removal and replacement of any street furniture or structures that may obstruct the route. We own a fleet of specialised equipment that is specifically used for projects in this sector, such as ` blade trailers and low profile wind tower adapters. Our qualified electrical and mechanical installation teams have the knowledge and experience to provide the most efficient solution, on a project by project basis. We can also provide our clients with port handling services. This includes equipment inspection, damage assessment, storage facilities and loading or reloading of equipment to specialist transport. “We offer different types of cranes for the erection of wind turbine components. The LG1750 combines the benefits of a crawler crane, it is high

Read More

A new innovative approach to windfarms could, at last, make them more popular and community friendly. Bringing the benefits and the profits home to local communities. Daniel Dubbelhuis, Account Manager Netherlands at Lagerwey tells us how. Large multi megawatt parks in concentrated areas developed by and for the local community, anonymous big developers - ensure further anonymization of wind turbines. Local residents feel that they get saddled with a problem that they have not asked for, resulting in a growing resistance to on land wind turbines. The last 10-20 years have shown how not to develop wind projects. The parties ultimately end up in court, each trying to get their own way. In the meantime sustainable energy becomes a conflict between developers and local residents. Why do we develop both large and small wind farms in this way? Why with each project achieved do we create more resistance to wind power? Shouldn’t the sustainability aspect also be reflected in the relationship between all the actors in a project?

Read More

The latest UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) technology allows swift, thorough inspections to assess turbines. Drones can be used either as part of routine reporting or for detailed inspections in preparations for rope access teams. This has many significant health and safety benefits for the technical teams in terms of assuring all anchor points are secure and preparing in advance for any repair work that will need to be done at height. Here, UAVONIC Ltd, shares the fundamentals of a typical aerial inspection and how wind O&M teams can benefit. UAVONIC works closely with inspection engineers to give the UAV Operators a good understanding of the wind turbine’s structure. So when on site with a client, pilots can understand the issues most commonly discovered upon inspection and what is required for the inspecting Engineer. When doing an inspection on a wind farm usually an inspection Engineer from the site would be present with the UAVONIC UAV team. There may be specific issues he is already aware of that he will want the pilot and camera operator to focus on, but all project plans will look similar consisting of the following scope of work:

Read More

Words: Thomas Arnold and Thomas Zirngibl, TÜV SÜD Industrie Service GmbH The recently revised TR6 Technical Guideline of the German Public Association of the Renewable Energy Sector (Fördergesellschaft Windenergie (FGW)) is designed to ensure the provision of reliable yield forecasts. Wind reports based on the Guideline play a critical role for producing reliable estimates of the profitability of a wind-farm project. In the past, turbines have often been shown to deliver lower energy levels than their reported estimates. The ninth revision of TR 6  now specifies methods that will help to produce realistic forecasts of actual on-site wind conditions. Wind speed and direction at the proposed site of a wind farm are critical factors in determining whether wind farm operation will be cost-effective over the long term. Previous practice has shown that measurements and evaluations of wind and weather data may be over-optimistic, favouring the stakeholders’ own interests. At least two wind reports issued by third-party organisations are therefore necessary to convince banks and investors of the profitability of a wind-farm project in order to secure financing. Independent accredited assessors are therefore commissioned to verify the yield forecast of a planned project. As these forecasts are always based on varying project-specific facts, figures

Read More

Words: Lindsay Roberts, Senior Policy Manager, Scottish Renewables Renewable energy is now our largest source of power and with over 5.5GW installed onshore, wind provides the lion’s share of that capacity. Can the Scottish and UK Governments work with industry and regulators to remove a series of barriers as suggested in a report by Everoze and explained here by Lindsay Roberts, Senior Policy Manager at Scottish Renewables? The sector has delivered hugely impressive cost reductions, leading some commentators to claim that it is already the cheapest form of new electricity generation plant on the market. It’s perhaps not surprising then that the appetite for further development remains undiminished, with another 7GW of capacity waiting in the wings. That pipeline, however, faces an uncertain future without a viable route to market. What is certain is that a successful future depends on our ability to reduce costs even further. Earlier this year (2016) Scottish Renewables commissioned energy consultancy Everoze to examine just how low the cost of onshore wind in Scotland could go and the steps needed to get us there.

Read More

The Race Bank Wind farm is being constructed by DONG Energy approximately 27 kilometres off Blakeney Point on the North Norfolk coast and 28 kilometres off the Lincolnshire Coast and Chapel St Leonards. It covers an area of 7511ha. Export cables bring the power from the wind farm to the substation onshore. These export cables run through the Wash and come ashore east to the mouth of the river Nene and approximately 6 km northeast of Sutton Bridge. The cables ashore run further in a southerly direction to the connections point at the existing Walpole Substation. The two export cables are both approximately 70km long and the two Offshore Substations (OSS) are linked with an interconnector of 4km. In March 2015 Jan De Nul was awarded a contract for the installation and burial of both export cables and the interlink cable.    Here we focus on the installation of the intertidal parts of the export cables and its special challenges. Environment The intertidal areas of The Wash compromise up to 10% of England’s saltmarshes and form one of England’s most important natural habitats. Mitigating any potential for the installation works to impact on these habitats is a key priority and measures to ensure that works

Read More