Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

PES asked Steve Sawyer, Secretary General at GWEC for his outlook on the future of the wind industry markets. Will prices continue to fall or have they reached their lowest point? Where is the market increasing? Where is it slowing down? Read on and find out… The global wind power market remained above 50 GW in 2017, with Europe, India and the offshore sector all having record years. Chinese installations were down - 19.66 GW - but the rest of the world made up for most of that. Total installations in 2017 were 52,492 MW, bringing the global total to 539,123 MW. The annual market was in fact down 3.8% on 2016’s 54,642 MW; and the cumulative total is up 11% over 2016’s year-end total of 487,219 MW. The offshore segment had a record year with 4,331 MW of installations, an 87% increase on the 2016 market, bringing total global installations to 18,814 MW, and representing a 30% increase in cumulative capacity globally. Offshore was about 8.4% of the 2017 annual market, and represents about 3.5% of cumulative installed capacity, but it’s growing quickly. Total new investment in clean energy rose to US$ 333.5bn (€296.8bn1) in 2017, up 3% over 2016, but still

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PES once again brings you an inside preview, this time of Global Offshore Wind 2018. Don’t miss out, book your tickets and come along to the biggest offshore conference of 2018. The industry is currently on a high and there is expectancy in the air. Offshore wind has massive potential. But what are the pathways to growth, what will it do for your country, and what does the industry look like as offshore wind becomes a core part of the global energy system? One thing is clear, transformation is coming. Are you ready for rapid growth, disruption, new ways of working, and acceleration of technology? Are you ready to play your part in the industry’s global ambition? Prepare for change at Global Offshore Wind 2018. Global Offshore Wind 2018 is the year’s largest dedicated offshore wind conference and exhibition taking place from June 19th – 20th at Manchester Central. This global event is organised by RenewableUK in partnership with industry leaders Equinor, innogy, MHI Vestas Offshore Wind, ORE Catapult and Scottish Power Renewables. The future of offshore wind Bloomberg New Energy Finance anticipates that the global offshore wind market will grow to 115GW by 2030 – a six-fold increase in 12 years! The opportunities

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The search for reliability in the renewable energy sector is an ongoing one. Increasing reliability in wind turbine parts reduces downtime and costs while allowing for a constant flow of power to the grid. Also, by finding new ways to improve processes and reduce the time and effort taken to identify and replace faulty parts, companies can drastically improve efficiency. For engineers in the Energy & Motion Technologies division at Galway-based Test Laboratory Anecto, striking a balance between innovation and quality control is essential to increasing reliability. They insist that innovation and research comes in tandem with quality control; citing as examples, their in-house refurbishment processes as well as recent work with the UK’s Durham University that has breathed new light on the stresses that changing wind patterns cause to a power converter’s IGBT and led to their conclusion that a ‘holistic approach to wind turbine power converter reliability’ is more advisable in future. Anecto test laboratory started as an electronics test house in 1994 but developed into a major provider of product and packaging testing for the medical devices and many other sectors. By leveraging the engineering talent they had on site and innovating, the company pushed into the renewable energy

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PES asked Tyler Ogden, Lux Research Inc. to give us his expert viewpoint on the longevity of PV systems. Lux Research is a leading provider of research and advisory services, helping clients drive growth through technology innovation. Utility-scale systems are now a competitive choice for electricity supply, with bids undercutting conventional sources of generation in some regions, while other regions see competitive subsidy-free deployments. This has largely been the result of declining module costs. Manufacturers have obtained significant economies of scale and have continued to adopt higher efficiency cell technologies. Meanwhile other players across the supply chain that offer balance of system components and developed projects have reached maturity, contributing to lowering the capital expense of new installations to a point where sub dollar-per-watt systems are now feasible. However, the rate of cost declines has begun to taper off. If solar costs are to continue to drop and maintain the precedent of low-cost renewables, the industry must look elsewhere – must look forward in time. The standard lifetime for a photovoltaic installation is 20 to 25 years, nearly double the time from when the global solar industry began to mature in early 2010s. The focus has primarily been in reducing dollar-per-watt costs to

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In this day and age recycling should be a top priority throughout the renewable energies sector. Dr. Palitzsch from Loser Chemie GmbH, reminds PES readers about the latest update to the EU waste legislation. It’s remarkable to see how it is possible to achieve total recovery of all materials, in both thin-film PV and silicon-based modules. According to the latest revision of the EU waste legislation (WEEE), producers of solar photovoltaic panels are responsible for the disposal and recycling of the modules they sell in EU Member States. In addition to this we also have a few other reasons to recycle all and any used materials. Recycling allows the materials, in otherwise one-use products, to go on to become something new and saves resources involved in sourcing new materials: that´s why it is amazing. And the best way is, of course, the complete recovery of all components. In recent years, Loser Chemie GmbH has led the search for a universal concept, for as many solar module types as possible. Today, the company has introduced a technology that enables the recycling of both thin-film PV and silicon-based modules. An important role is played by light and water. Used correctly complete disassembly of old solar

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Make plans to attend Intersolar and ees North America, the first major solar and storage industry events of the year in the United States. The co-located exhibition and conference series will return to the heart of the largest solar and storage market in the country, July 10th - 12th at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. Together, these events sit at the cross-section of solar technology, energy storage and smart transportation, and connect industry professionals from across the world. Since 2008, Intersolar North America has served as the industry’s go-to event for invaluable information and premier networking opportunities, and this year’s event is no different. Expect to see an expanded focus on the technologies and market opportunities for solar and storage, as well as a new special exhibition, Power2Drive, focused on the electrification of transportation. Conference sessions and exhibition workshops will feature insightful commentary from leading executives, policymakers, and industry experts designed to give attendees a critical business edge. This year, attendees will benefit from special attention paid to the recent tariffs passed by the Trump Administration in response to the Section 201 trade complaint, as well as conference sessions on smart renewable energy, the rise of project finance, applications for

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It’s that time of the year. Are you ready for Intersolar Europe and Intersolar North America? PES brings you previews of two of the biggest solar shows. Be sure to come along and make the most of the opportunity to see the latest advance technology, the new players in the market, catch up with old favourites and network like crazy. Smart, solar, sector coupling: Intersolar Europe 2018 showcases the future of modern energy supply. A sunny outlook for the European and global photovoltaics (PV) markets: Photovoltaics deployment of around 110 gigawatts is expected worldwide for 2018 – a significant step forward for PV. The European PV market too is sending out positive signals. New PV systems with a total output of at least 8.61 gigawatts were installed across the continent last year alone. According to the latest analysis by SolarPower Europe, this represents a 28 percent increase over 2016. Over 30 percent growth has been forecast for 2018 – alongside Germany, most notably in France, Italy, the Netherlands and Spain. The PV market in Europe is primarily being driven by public tenders and power purchase agreements. The advantages of solar power self-consumption are also bolstering growth. In Spain and the Netherlands, 2018

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With ample desert space and swathes of sunshine all year round, the solar power industry is starting to heat up in the countries of the Gulf Coorporation Council (GCC). Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates are all well placed to benefit from technology advancements and lowering costs. Over the past few years, the UAE has launched some major solar projects, while Saudi Arabia announced the largest-ever project in March this year. The GCC’s increase of solar generation capacity is well timed. The global renewable energy industry is experiencing considerable growth, supported by governments and policymakers’ efforts to combat climate change, a steady decline in renewable generation costs over the past decade, and continued technological developments. As such, we expect that most GCC countries will continue to invest in solar efforts in the years to come. Lower costs, higher investment Renewable power installation costs have been declining sharply over the past decade, driven by technological improvements and the associated increased efficiencies. In turn, these developments are making renewable energy a viable alternative to traditional carbon-based electricity generation. The considerable growth in the global renewables sector as a result is encouraging. According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), renewables represented two-thirds

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Global wind capacity is set to double by 2027, and the United States is in the midst of the most lucrative time to increase production of wind energy. Renewable companies are fueled by an urgency to capture tax subsidies and currently in many parts of the country; wind is the cheapest source of new electric generating capacity. Even with the many environmental benefits of wind farms over traditional sources, wind still faces opposition across the U.S., especially in rural areas. South Dakota has been expecting dramatic growth in wind energy production for some time now, but the contentious debates surrounding the approval of new wind farms has created a drift between residents and caused the state to lag. Although in most cases wind turbines will create a minimal impact on the landscape, some residents feel the turbines are too unsightly, loud, and disruptive to wildlife, ignoring the many benefits, such as tax revenue, the project will bring to the state and local communities. Despite the local opposition, there has been recent good news from the federal government for offshore wind projects, as the Trump administration announced it is pushing ahead with building wind turbines off the Atlantic coastline. The Bureau of Ocean Energy

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Gerry Lalonde, CEO, Orenda Energy Solutions explains to PES that Farmers have a great opportunity to ‘pledge a field’ and reap a financial windfall through small wind renewables. Farmers are having a bad time of it. Many have witnessed a fall in income due to the recent spate of bad weather. There is the worry, too, about how a ‘bad’ Brexit might unfold, with fruit farmers across the country particularly concerned about future harvests and how their reliance on migrant workers might impact on their industry. I’d like to think, however, that small wind renewable energy might help farmers add a few thousand pounds a year to their incomes and they need do nothing more than offer a field or small piece of land to see that come a reality. The UK has remained an attractive proposition for inward investment in the country’s small wind energy industry and there are farming communities across the country already bringing in extra income from this enterprising initiative, with farmers looking beyond their traditional arable, livestock and dairy revenue streams, but much needs to be done now to get more farmers to realise this huge investment potential. Farmers need to maximise land use and with a ‘per-turbine’ windfall

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