Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

Words: K. Adriaenssen, W. Smook, J. Peeters A revolution is happening in the world of renewable energy. All key markets have adopted auction-based approaches to subsidising renewables. New wind market dynamics In theory, the idea is rather simple. Set a target level of investment in renewable energy capacity, and then allocate contracts to the lowest bidders. As renewable energy markets mature and penetration increases, a growing number of countries are looking to reduce subsidy costs by spurring competition. This concept will initiate large disruptions as markets evolve to a new equilibrium. Looking at how procurement costs are falling in countries that had previously relied on other mechanisms, it seems possible – even likely – that auction-based procurement is accelerating price erosion and reducing procurement costs relative to what we would have seen otherwise. This sounds like good news. But is it really? It’s good news if falling procurement costs reflect the market’s ability to seek out the most cost-effective projects, and if this competitive pressure will fuel efficient innovation going forward. But there are concerns about whether the industry can cope with the developments and cost reductions going forward. The success of these dynamic market conditions will depend on an understanding of how auctions can be

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Words: Jenny Hogan, Deputy Chief Executive, Scottish Renewables The UK has more offshore wind turbines than any other country in the world. But while Scotland has 25% of the whole European wind resource, only around 5% of the UK’s offshore wind fleet is currently north of the border. Finally, however, that is starting to change. Record-low prices in September’s Contracts for Difference saw EDPR’s Moray East project succeed where it had previously lost out. This scheme will now join SSE’s Beatrice in the stormy seas off our North East coast. It isn’t just the wind farms themselves which are happening in Scotland, either. Two events in coming months – a Floating Offshore Wind Conference on November 14 and Scottish Renewables’ Offshore Wind Conference on January 29-30 – will allow a burgeoning supply chain to share ideas with developers and decision-makers. Both come at a key time for the sector, with policy optimism still buoying up offshore wind following the largely-positive Clean Growth Strategy and secondly, the CfD auction results. The results of this auction were good news for Scotland, for our environment and for our energy system. The cost reductions in offshore wind have been dramatic and are testament to the determination of developers to drive down costs

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In case you missed out on this excellent event PES brings you your exclusive post show report from last month’s, 10th Offshore Energy Exhibition & Conference, which took place in Amsterdam, The Netherlands under the theme Transformation through collaboration. During the Offshore WIND Conference, part of Offshore Energy, as well as on a discussion square on the exhibition floor, there was attention for collaboration between the offshore oil and gas industry on the one hand and the offshore wind industry on the other and how this can transform energy transition on the North Sea. On the North Sea, energy transition is taking place under our eyes. On the hand we see strong growth in offshore wind and on the other hand we witness cessation and decommissioning of oil and gas production activities. At a place on the Offshore Energy exhibition floor called ‘Community Square’ – designed to cater to the entire offshore oil, gas and renewables community – there was a television style talk-show on the future of the North Sea, more specifically on the future of North Sea energy infrastructure. The talk-show was organized in cooperation with the ‘North Sea Energy program’ – a research program financed by the

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With the interest in wind energy on the rise, foundation suppliers are hard pressed to meet the developers’ demands in terms of design, delivery and installation. PES brings you the PEIKKO view from the North, where investment in new turbines is paying off and energy from wind is ever increasing. Wind the most profitable way of producing energy Wind has always been clean, but now it’s also economical. According to the American Wind Energy Association, ‘wind prices are extremely competitive right now, offering lower costs than other possible resources’, while Bloomberg New Energy Finance has noted that ‘onshore wind is fully competitive against gas and coal’. This has created a wind energy boom with some 30,000 new turbines built every year to add to a tally of around 500,000 wind power plants in use around the world. A quantum leap of turbine technology The wind is in the middle of a similar technology leap that revolutionised the cell phone performance and use a decade ago. We have seen a significant increase in the turbine size and power generation figures. ‘If you take the situation three years ago as a baseline and give that an index of 100, we are now at 250,’ Kari Tuominen,

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Gerry Lalonde, CEO, Orenda Energy Solutions, tells PES how he feels wind energy could be exchanged from one location to another. This is certainly food for thought and could make a big difference to small turbine owners, or perspective owners with no space near their current location. One of the chief concerns facing the small/medium wind energy industry is a geographical one, based purely on supply and demand. Imagine a business located in the middle of an urban area that wishes to be self-sustaining with its own ‘green’ electricity supply. If the business is located in an area where there is little or no wind and local planning laws preclude them from siting a small turbine on the property, is there not a conversation to be had with Government, which leads to a relaxing of the rules whereby any business can buy and erect a turbine on a ‘wind-friendly’ landscape, in another part of the country and have access to the equivalent amount of generated energy by these turbines from the grid? Is this not a classic case of supply not being efficiently matched to demand? Current legislation prohibits an energy consumer based on the South Coast of England, to purchase a wind turbine

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Words: Steven Foong, Global Maritime This article will look at the marine operations standards and guidelines that are emerging; areas that need to be considered in putting in place such standards; and how it is also incumbent on the marine providers themselves to put the necessary mechanisms in place internally. There’s no doubt that offshore wind is on the increase in Europe, Asia and the United States. Bloomberg New Energy Finance, an energy research organization, predicts that the world’s offshore wind-generation capacity will quadruple by 2025. The size of wind turbines is also increasing at such a rate that turbines with a capacity of up to 15MW are likely to be installed in the near future, according to the Chief Executive of Renewable UK, the UK trade association. The European Wind Energy Association also estimates that between 20 GW and 40 GW of offshore wind energy capacity will be operating in the European Union by 2020. Yet, just as the industry is continuing to grow, so do the necessary marine standards need to improve to ensure safe and effective operations. Current standards & guidelines So what current marine operations standards and guidelines are being used? While such standards and guidelines in offshore wind were perhaps slow to take

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Words: Scott Starr, Firetrace International, Marketing Director Wind turbine fire protection: investing to protect the bottom line. Fire is the second leading cause of accidents in wind turbines after blade failure1, with the average overall cost of a wind turbine fire being around $4.5m2. Given that $112.5bn was ploughed in to wind power globally in 20163, wouldn’t it be prudent to invest a little more of that in fire suppression? When a fire occurs the typical action is simply to wait for it to burn out. This can cause significant damage leading to thousands of dollars of repair costs, plus revenue losses as a result of downtime. To illustrate, a single 2.5-3MW commercial scale wind turbine is valued at approximately $3-$4m4, with the value of the output averaging $2,8005 per day. It’s clear, therefore, that the financial impact of even a minor fire, which can still cause weeks of downtime, can be significant - the average total cost of a wind turbine fire is $4.5m6. Causes There are generally three main causes of wind turbine fires: mechanical failure, electrical malfunction and lightning strikes. A small fire can accelerate quickly in a nacelle that comprises highly flammable resin fiberglass. Internal insulation in the nacelle, which

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As the wind industry continues its unprecedented growth, over 8,000 participants are expected to gather this November for the WindEurope Conference & Exhibition 2017 in the Amsterdam RAI Exhibition and Convention Centre, November 28th to 30th 2017. PES brings you a taster of the exciting things on offer. Have you got your tickets? We’ll see you there.. This event, organised in partnership between WindEurope and The Netherlands Wind Energy Association (NWEA), will build on the tremendous momentum achieved in recent years by wind power. “Considerable industry efforts have been made to make renewable energy cheaper than fossil fuels”, says Event Ambassador and Vestas CEO Anders Runevad. “It’s now time that markets, infrastructure and policies reflect this reality.” The Amsterdam conference and exhibition will build on the wind industry’s emergence as a hotbed of innovation and unprecedented ambition, and will be the ideal occasion for industry insiders to expand their knowledge base, make the contacts they need, and solidify an industry-wide vision for the future of this rapidly expanding sector. Local impact & global leadership The event will have two interlocking areas of focus: a macroeconomic overview will demonstrate that wind is powering Europe’s transition from fossil fuels to clean energy, while a microeconomic focus

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Innovative sensor technologies, advanced modelling and new business models are all corner stones in how ZF Wind Power is digitalizing the manufacturing business. For ZF Wind Power digitalization and the Internet of Things (IoT) is an integrated part of this transformation. For a long time, the wind power industry has been among the front-runners when it comes to connectivity of products and analyzing data in order to optimize products and processes. However, the challenges and benefits have mainly been left to OEMs and turbine owners, with limited feedback to component suppliers. As the leading transmission supplier in the wind industry, ZF Wind Power is now stepping up the ambition of data insights, taking a leading position on product risk commitments and launching ground-breaking sensing technology used to control speed and drivetrain torque. Thanks to digitalization, ZF connected gearboxes can automatically sense the best way to optimize energy generation and improve turbine economics for any wind site conditions. A new control strategy with the focus on drivetrain torque ZF Wind Power, as a business unit of ZF Friedrichshafen AG, has extensive experience of delivering transmissions across industries. More than a decade ago a paradigm shift in drivetrain design for automotive changed how gearboxes were

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Does a bottlenose dolphin change its ranging movement because of a wind turbine? Or a razorbill change its migration route? How do human beings change behaviours with an offshore wind farm nearby? PES brings you a pioneering scientific research programme from Vattenfall, which aims to answer these questions and more. Four projects have initially been selected to receive a share of the €3mn Scientific Research and Monitoring Fund which is the brainchild of Swedish energy company Vattenfall. The projects will be based at Vattenfall’s European Offshore Wind Deployment Centre (EOWDC) in Aberdeen Bay. Adam Ezzamel, Project Director for the EOWDC, said they felt such a programme represented an opportunity that was too good to miss. ‘These projects will be carried out in a real-time environment as part of the largest-scale offshore wind programme of its kind. Conducting this research at the EOWDC is an unmissable chance to gain hitherto unknown knowledge of the environmental effects of offshore wind developments. ‘Not only will this programme place Scotland at the forefront of research and development in the sector and reinforce its position as a renewable energy powerhouse, it will inform industry policy-making in Europe and beyond.’ The 11-turbine EOWDC is Scotland’s largest offshore wind test and

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