Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

PES caught up with Andreas Jagtøyen, Senior Vice President, Energy Division, Kongsberg Digital AS, who gave us a full account of their EmPower software suite. A way for wind farm asset managers to make informed choices to maximise production and reduce costs. PES: Welcome to PES Wind magazine. Thanks for talking with us. Would you like to begin by explaining a little about the background of Kongsberg and the importance of the offshore wind industry to you? Andreas Jagtøyen: KONGSBERG finds the offshore wind industry highly interesting, especially seen in the light of increased need for renewable energy. One of the main reasons for our interest is that the offshore wind market shares many interesting commonalities with what we're doing in both the maritime area and in the oil and gas area. In addition, the offshore wind market is experiencing exceptional growth, and, although it is little known, KONGSBERG has long experience with the offshore wind industry, having supplied sensor systems and services to the wind sector for more than 20 years.

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After a difficult period, the heavy lift industry is making changes and diversifying. PES finds out how one such company is meeting the challenge head on. All the know-how and expertise is already in place for what looks like the beginning of a heavy lift revival. HANSA HEAVY LIFT, which specialises in heavy lift, super heavy lift and project cargo, is stepping up its involvement in the offshore industry with a strong focus on transportation and installation (T&I) in the subsea oil and gas market, as well as the offshore wind farm sector. Wholly owned by the investment company Oaktree, the shipping line manages a fleet of 17 vessels and operates a dynamic positioning class 3 (DP3) construction vessel, which is ideally suited for offshore installation projects. With the heavy lift industry in a state of flux and still recovering from a period of overcapacity, HANSA HEAVY LIFT sees much potential for the future in the offshore T&I market. The carrier notes there was a steep drop in investment in the project and heavy lift market in 2016, and very little activity going forward for new projects.

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Coming off a record year in 2015, where a ‘perfect storm’ of circumstances pushed the Chinese market to 30 GW and the global market past 60 GW, 2016 was a solid if mostly unspectacular year for the wind power industry. More than 54 GW of clean renewable power was installed across the global market, which now comprises more than 90 countries, including 9 with more than 10,000 MW installed, and 29 which have now passed the 1,000 MW mark. Cumulative capacity grew by 12.6% to reach a total of 486.8 GW. Wind power penetration levels continue to increase, led by Denmark pushing 40%, followed by Uruguay, Portugal and Ireland with well over 20%, Spain and Cyprus around 20%, Germany at 16%; and the big markets of China, the US and Canada get 4, 5.5, and 6% of their power from wind, respectively. Much of the reduction from the 2015 market was because China ‘only’ installed 23 GW instead of 2015’s phenomenal 30 GW. The 2015 numbers were driven by an impending cut in the feed-in-tariff which came into effect in January 2016. We face the same situation again in 2017, with an impending tariff reduction on January 2018. While we don’t

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The past decade has been a period of large evolutionary steps for offshore wind and the upcoming years are set to continue this trend, further establishing wind power as a maturing player in the global energy mix. As economy of scale is driving up the size of turbines and wind farms, the offshore units used to install and maintain these offshore farms are evolving as well. The step-up in capacity of these units opens up possibilities to incorporate another dynamic, cleaner and evolving player in the energy mix; LNG or Liquefied Natural Gas, which is gaining traction as a fuel for various sectors of the offshore and maritime industry. These industries are experiencing increasingly stricter global and local emission limits, mainly due to a continuing rise in environmental awareness and subsequent political initiatives. The most recent and perhaps far-reaching example of this is the global Sulphur cap of 0.5% on marine fuels, set to come into effect in 2020. Hence, lowering emissions, fuel consumption and the overall growth of alternative power generation is a prominent maritime development. Offshore wind farm installation and maintenance operations offer favourable conditions for the use of LNG. This is due to the relatively high predictability of the

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Abstract: Larger wind turbines and increasing water depths are presenting industry with new challenges for the realisation of economical foundation systems. The issues confronting industry here are manifold and include not only the optimisation and validation of structures or soil-structure interaction models, but also the development of economical installation methods with mitigated noise levels. Experimental validation of prediction models Optimised calculation methods are required for the economical design of support or foundation structures. The engineer has a broad range of prediction models with different levels of complexity available for this purpose. During the design process, these models complement each other and can be categorised as semi-empirical models, analytical models, or numerical models. The decision as to which of these models represents the engineering problem with sufficient accuracy is usually based on experience. All models have one thing in common though: Regardless of whether they are simple or complex, they have to be validated with the aid of physical experiments before they can be utilised. A distinction is made here between small-scale, large-scale, and real-scale experimental tests. Since the load-bearing and deformation behaviour of the soil depends on the stress level, small-scale tests (scale 1:100 to 1:30) are often not sufficiently accurate

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Words: Dr Ralf Köpke The reactions in the German, specialist media have been consistently positive. Last September, Deutsche Windtechnik which is based in Bremen announced that it had acquired a 70 percent stake in the Dutch company OutSmart B.V. One of the comments was, "Germany's largest independent service provider in the wind energy sector is strategically positioning itself to win additional contracts for work at sea." OutSmart is not the first company in Germany or abroad that Deutsche Windtechnik has acquired a stake in but it is one that opens up many new opportunities. "Our own range of services had hardly any overlap with Deutsche Windtechnik's, so we complement each other perfectly," said Erwin Coolen, one of the three managing directors and founders of the Dutch service provider. He sees the merger as a 'classic win-win situation'. Even stronger together A look at the areas in which both companies have been active until now shows that this is true. In 2013, the German company established a subsidiary called Deutsche Windtechnik Offshore und Consulting GmbH which focused mainly on service and maintenance tasks. Consulting and project support were seen as additional businesses. The offshore wind farm management activities of the Dutch company, on the other hand,

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Words: Linda Blunk in cooperation with Blanke Meier Evers Project developers of offshore wind power have growing concerns, even anxieties, which mirror their apprehension about a basic injustice inherent in the future tendering process stipulated by the new German Offshore Wind Energy Act (WindSeeG). This apprehension has already led to numerous legal inquiries which focus on the following question: Is the tendering procedure pursuant to the WindSeeG unconstitutional, more specifically, can a project developer, who has lost a bid, correct the tender procedure or can he even enforce the award? I. Tendering Process during the Transition Period There are numerous examples in German jurisdiction, where tender results have been set aside by a court. For example, Landgericht Köln (Regional Court, Cologne) recently ruled in favour of a utility company, providing energy, water and waste disposal, that had alleged that the tender process had been ‘opaque and discriminatory’ because at an early stage a certain bidder (“ENWOR”) had been favoured, thus robbing other bidders of their chance of success and stage managing the process. In the realm of offshore wind energy there are also numerous bidders with scant chance of success who are in competition with handful of bidders with good prospects. This is the

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For the past 3 years, ALL NRG has combined the strengths of several leading Danish energy service providers to create a solid base for further development. PES went to find out how this has been achieved and why there is optimism in the air. Collecting industry know-how from its individual business segments, such as high voltage, mechanical wind, and inspection and advisory services has given ALL NRG the strength to develop their business in the right direction to respond to the latest market conditions. Until recently, the market consisted of smaller service providers offering fragmented solutions to manufacturers and developers in the wind-power industry. Now companies are gathering their forces as the market demands a turn towards large tender processes and full scope projects. In addition, the increasing demands for higher Health, Safety, Environment, and Quality (HSEQ) levels has made it difficult for smaller companies to compete. First mover Even though the ALL NRG name is still fairly new to the industry, the companies behind it are far from newcomers to the business. The integrated ALL NRG has a list of references with which it is hard to compete. Having worked on more than 90% of the world’s municipally sponsored offshore wind turbines, the

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Words: Peter Hearn, Operations Manager, ActSafe In this, second of four articles, we see how ActSafe Powered Ascenders can be used for material lifting in the wind energy industry. What is an ActSafe Portable Powered Winch? A Portable Powered Winch is a Li-ion battery or petrol powered lifting apparatus that is certified for lifting both loads, personnel and for lowering operations. The winches use readily available, 11mm kernmantle ropes so only rope length limits the lifting distances. The Working Load Limit is 200 and 250kg so these winches are a flexible tool that makes it possible to lift a wide variety of cargo and facilitate positioning operations. Nacelle In wind energy maintenance time is money, particularly when offshore, where weather windows are short. What happens when your crew arrive onsite, with a restricted time opportunity to get the turbine back online and they are unable to get tools and material into the turbine because the installed lifting equipment is not fit for purpose? An Actsafe portable battery powered winch, with a lifting capacity of 200Kg will ensure your maintenance teams can complete the task. This will reduce the risk of prolonged downtime. It also means it’s not necessary to have a permanent chain hoist fitted to

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In October 2016 PES brought you the newly baptised Vol au Vent. It has certainly been a winner for Jan de Nul, with ongoing projects and planned improvements to increase the crane’s capacity and available deck space. The Blyth Offshore Demonstrator Project During the third quarter of 2017, Jan De Nul Group’s vessel Vole au Vent will start the installation of 5 MHI Vestas 8.3 MW turbines at the Blyth Offshore Demonstrator Project. This new project is located 5.7km off the coast of Blyth, Northumberland, UK. The Jan De Nul Group was awarded the contract in March 2016 after FID was achieved by EDF Renewables UK. The Blyth Offshore Demonstrator wind farm will have an initially installed capacity of 41.5MW of electricity, which is enough to provide approximately 34,000 homes of renewable energy. Third in a row This project will be the third project in a row for the Vole au Vent since it was acquired by Jan De Nul Group in 2015. The previous projects were the Bligh Bank Phase II project and the Tahkoluoto project in Finland. By the time the new project starts, the two previous projects will have been completed.

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