Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

While performing service and maintenance on wind energy plants, employees routinely work at great heights. Fall protection is therefore a requirement for them. They use climbing protection equipment when climbing the towers. When it comes to work safety, leading manufacturers are increasingly involving users in the development of new solutions. Collaboration between Siemens Gamesa, the manufacturer SKYLOTEC, and the supplier ICM Safety shows how this works successfully. The ’Claw’ cable runner for steel ropes is a solution that simplifies use and reduces the risk of accident. With around 27,000 employees on five continents, Siemens Gamesa is one of the leading providers in the renewable energy industry. The company provides service and maintenance for 23,000 turbines around the world. They monitor more than 3,000 onshore and offshore facilities in Great Britain and Ireland alone. Fall protection is required for employees while they perform service and maintenance work on wind power systems. This does not just apply to when they are working high up, on the turbine. In many cases, Siemens Gamesa employees reach the turbine by means of a climbing protection system that is installed within the tower. This consists of a rigid anchor line, such as a steel rope or rail and

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We have said this before but how much lighter and more efficient can these heavy lift jack-up vessels get? PES brings you SOUL, the 4th generation of wind turbine installation vessels. After successfully launching their revolutionary heavy lift jack-up vessel design, SOUL-partners, SeaOwls and Ulstein, continued their mission to develop the optimal range of heavy lift jack-up vessels that will enable the offshore wind industry to bring down the cost of renewable energy. Different from the existing third generation fleet of wind turbine installation vessels (WTIVs), the SOUL heavy lift jack-up vessel design was conceived with the actual lifting operation from a stable-up platform, in mind. This design focus resulted in an unmatched heavy lift performance in terms of lifted load, reach and height for a jack-up vessel, when used for either afloat or firmly standing on its four legs. Existing WTIVs are either ‘ships with legs’ or ‘self-propelled jack-up barges’ and both design concepts have their own strengths and weaknesses. Legged ships have limited payload and lifting capacities due to their heavy structures and narrow gaps between portside and starboard legs. Jack-up barges, with propulsion, have their own sailing and seakeeping challenges. SOUL - the fourth generation of wind turbine installation vessels The SOUL

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Words: Jenny Hogan, Deputy Chief Executive, Scottish Renewables The UK has more offshore wind turbines than any other country in the world. But while Scotland has 25% of the whole European wind resource, only around 5% of the UK’s offshore wind fleet is currently north of the border. Finally, however, that is starting to change. Record-low prices in September’s Contracts for Difference saw EDPR’s Moray East project succeed where it had previously lost out. This scheme will now join SSE’s Beatrice in the stormy seas off our North East coast. It isn’t just the wind farms themselves which are happening in Scotland, either. Two events in coming months – a Floating Offshore Wind Conference on November 14 and Scottish Renewables’ Offshore Wind Conference on January 29-30 – will allow a burgeoning supply chain to share ideas with developers and decision-makers. Both come at a key time for the sector, with policy optimism still buoying up offshore wind following the largely-positive Clean Growth Strategy and secondly, the CfD auction results. The results of this auction were good news for Scotland, for our environment and for our energy system. The cost reductions in offshore wind have been dramatic and are testament to the determination of developers to drive down costs

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PES met up with Marten Seifert, MD of RECASE Regenerative Energien GmbH, Germany. He is very excited about the growth in projects and puts this down to the expertise and knowledge of his team of engineers. PES: Welcome to PES Wind magazine. Thanks for talking with us. Would you like to begin by explaining a little about the background of RECASE and how you currently serve the wind industry? Marten Seifert: RECASE is a small but efficient company made up of long serving wind turbine engineers. Lorenz and I founded RECASE in 2013, after gaining a lot of experience with wind turbine (WT) manufacturing companies over many years. Together with Maurice Graber, who has been our project engineer from the very beginning, we have been able to develop services for our customers in the industry, based on our knowledge, quality and capacity. Two years later Jörg Zeumer, the main electrical designer and developer for REpower wind turbines from 1998, joined our team. Today we are a team of 8 engineers, including the founders, one administrator and additional students from different fields of engineering expertise. PES: You work in different energy sectors, but how important is the wind industry to you? MS: For sure the wind industry

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PES is pleased to share this practical advice on saving time and money, in getting approval for wind farm projects, from Al Maiorino, the President of Public Strategy Group, Inc.,. This is based on his years of experience in successful and varied campaigns throughout the USA and abroad. Renewable project companies have moved light years in the past decade on their ability to educate residents on the benefits of renewable projects. However, there is more work to be done to ensure that wind and other renewable projects do not get entangled in a web of misinformation, and eventually delayed or even defeated. All too often, companies find that every single month a project is delayed, the renewable company loses thousands of dollars. Even a delay of a few weeks is costly, so keeping with a strict entitlement calendar is essential. This month, one such project blocked by the Scottish government was West Coast Energy’s Highland Perthshire wind proposal. The wind farm was in the pipelines for five years and had been scaled back from forty to twenty-five turbines in response to public outcry. The project would have been able to generate enough clean energy to power 40,000 homes and start a community

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In case you missed out on this excellent event PES brings you your exclusive post show report from last month’s, 10th Offshore Energy Exhibition & Conference, which took place in Amsterdam, The Netherlands under the theme Transformation through collaboration. During the Offshore WIND Conference, part of Offshore Energy, as well as on a discussion square on the exhibition floor, there was attention for collaboration between the offshore oil and gas industry on the one hand and the offshore wind industry on the other and how this can transform energy transition on the North Sea. On the North Sea, energy transition is taking place under our eyes. On the hand we see strong growth in offshore wind and on the other hand we witness cessation and decommissioning of oil and gas production activities. At a place on the Offshore Energy exhibition floor called ‘Community Square’ – designed to cater to the entire offshore oil, gas and renewables community – there was a television style talk-show on the future of the North Sea, more specifically on the future of North Sea energy infrastructure. The talk-show was organized in cooperation with the ‘North Sea Energy program’ – a research program financed by the

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With the interest in wind energy on the rise, foundation suppliers are hard pressed to meet the developers’ demands in terms of design, delivery and installation. PES brings you the PEIKKO view from the North, where investment in new turbines is paying off and energy from wind is ever increasing. Wind the most profitable way of producing energy Wind has always been clean, but now it’s also economical. According to the American Wind Energy Association, ‘wind prices are extremely competitive right now, offering lower costs than other possible resources’, while Bloomberg New Energy Finance has noted that ‘onshore wind is fully competitive against gas and coal’. This has created a wind energy boom with some 30,000 new turbines built every year to add to a tally of around 500,000 wind power plants in use around the world. A quantum leap of turbine technology The wind is in the middle of a similar technology leap that revolutionised the cell phone performance and use a decade ago. We have seen a significant increase in the turbine size and power generation figures. ‘If you take the situation three years ago as a baseline and give that an index of 100, we are now at 250,’ Kari Tuominen,

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Gerry Lalonde, CEO, Orenda Energy Solutions, tells PES how he feels wind energy could be exchanged from one location to another. This is certainly food for thought and could make a big difference to small turbine owners, or perspective owners with no space near their current location. One of the chief concerns facing the small/medium wind energy industry is a geographical one, based purely on supply and demand. Imagine a business located in the middle of an urban area that wishes to be self-sustaining with its own ‘green’ electricity supply. If the business is located in an area where there is little or no wind and local planning laws preclude them from siting a small turbine on the property, is there not a conversation to be had with Government, which leads to a relaxing of the rules whereby any business can buy and erect a turbine on a ‘wind-friendly’ landscape, in another part of the country and have access to the equivalent amount of generated energy by these turbines from the grid? Is this not a classic case of supply not being efficiently matched to demand? Current legislation prohibits an energy consumer based on the South Coast of England, to purchase a wind turbine

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Words: Sasaenia P. Oluwabunmi, Kayode E. Oluwabunmi & Athanasios J. Kolios Abstract: The development of adequate energy sources to satisfy the ever increasing energy demand in the world has led to the deployment of several offshore energy installations. Offshore Oil & Gas and renewable energy installations have had a lot of growth in recent years; this growth has led to an increase in the accompanying risks and challenges faced by these industries especially regarding policy implementation. Thus, it is pertinent to assess all the risks in the offshore energy industry, to create a ‘feed-in base’ applicable to both offshore renewables and offshore oil and gas industries. This paper analyses all the risks in the offshore energy industry in relation to policy through Failure Mode and Effects (FMEA) analysis using Risk Prioritisation Numbers (RPNs). 1. Introduction The offshore oil and gas sector generates around £20 billion of revenue per annum and £12.8 billion of Gross Value Added (GVA) whilst supporting induced, indirect and direct employment of more than 190,000 people; thus, making it one of the key sectors of the UK economy [1]. This scenario is true not only for the West but also for major emerging economies; for example, in Nigeria, offshore oil

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Safety is of paramount importance when working at the dizzy height of a wind turbine. Brad Prickett, the senior lubrication engineer at ExxonMobil Fuels & Lubricants, located in Houston, gives PES his insight on how this can be improved. This is his area of expertise as he has worked with wind turbine operators since the mid-2000s. When it comes to the safety of your wind turbine operation, lubrication can have a bigger impact than you might think. That’s because the greatest safety risks to an operation typically occur during equipment servicing and maintenance. Take, for example, a routine oil change. What is a fairly straightforward process for ground-based equipment becomes much more complex for wind turbine equipment, as maintenance teams must ascend the tower, sometimes to elevations as high as 400 feet, before carefully inspecting the equipment to determine if any additional servicing is needed before refilling components with the new oil. This is no easy task, which is why one of the most effective opportunities to enhance the safety of a wind turbine operation is by reducing human-machine interaction (HMI), or the frequency which maintenance personnel interact with wind turbine equipment. Reducing HMIs requires having a robust lubrication program that prevents unnecessary downtime and

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