Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

Words: Dr Ralf Köpke The reactions in the German, specialist media have been consistently positive. Last September, Deutsche Windtechnik which is based in Bremen announced that it had acquired a 70 percent stake in the Dutch company OutSmart B.V. One of the comments was, "Germany's largest independent service provider in the wind energy sector is strategically positioning itself to win additional contracts for work at sea." OutSmart is not the first company in Germany or abroad that Deutsche Windtechnik has acquired a stake in but it is one that opens up many new opportunities. "Our own range of services had hardly any overlap with Deutsche Windtechnik's, so we complement each other perfectly," said Erwin Coolen, one of the three managing directors and founders of the Dutch service provider. He sees the merger as a 'classic win-win situation'. Even stronger together A look at the areas in which both companies have been active until now shows that this is true. In 2013, the German company established a subsidiary called Deutsche Windtechnik Offshore und Consulting GmbH which focused mainly on service and maintenance tasks. Consulting and project support were seen as additional businesses. The offshore wind farm management activities of the Dutch company, on the other hand,

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Words: Linda Blunk in cooperation with Blanke Meier Evers Project developers of offshore wind power have growing concerns, even anxieties, which mirror their apprehension about a basic injustice inherent in the future tendering process stipulated by the new German Offshore Wind Energy Act (WindSeeG). This apprehension has already led to numerous legal inquiries which focus on the following question: Is the tendering procedure pursuant to the WindSeeG unconstitutional, more specifically, can a project developer, who has lost a bid, correct the tender procedure or can he even enforce the award? I. Tendering Process during the Transition Period There are numerous examples in German jurisdiction, where tender results have been set aside by a court. For example, Landgericht Köln (Regional Court, Cologne) recently ruled in favour of a utility company, providing energy, water and waste disposal, that had alleged that the tender process had been ‘opaque and discriminatory’ because at an early stage a certain bidder (“ENWOR”) had been favoured, thus robbing other bidders of their chance of success and stage managing the process. In the realm of offshore wind energy there are also numerous bidders with scant chance of success who are in competition with handful of bidders with good prospects. This is the

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For the past 3 years, ALL NRG has combined the strengths of several leading Danish energy service providers to create a solid base for further development. PES went to find out how this has been achieved and why there is optimism in the air. Collecting industry know-how from its individual business segments, such as high voltage, mechanical wind, and inspection and advisory services has given ALL NRG the strength to develop their business in the right direction to respond to the latest market conditions. Until recently, the market consisted of smaller service providers offering fragmented solutions to manufacturers and developers in the wind-power industry. Now companies are gathering their forces as the market demands a turn towards large tender processes and full scope projects. In addition, the increasing demands for higher Health, Safety, Environment, and Quality (HSEQ) levels has made it difficult for smaller companies to compete. First mover Even though the ALL NRG name is still fairly new to the industry, the companies behind it are far from newcomers to the business. The integrated ALL NRG has a list of references with which it is hard to compete. Having worked on more than 90% of the world’s municipally sponsored offshore wind turbines, the

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Words: Peter Hearn, Operations Manager, ActSafe In this, second of four articles, we see how ActSafe Powered Ascenders can be used for material lifting in the wind energy industry. What is an ActSafe Portable Powered Winch? A Portable Powered Winch is a Li-ion battery or petrol powered lifting apparatus that is certified for lifting both loads, personnel and for lowering operations. The winches use readily available, 11mm kernmantle ropes so only rope length limits the lifting distances. The Working Load Limit is 200 and 250kg so these winches are a flexible tool that makes it possible to lift a wide variety of cargo and facilitate positioning operations. Nacelle In wind energy maintenance time is money, particularly when offshore, where weather windows are short. What happens when your crew arrive onsite, with a restricted time opportunity to get the turbine back online and they are unable to get tools and material into the turbine because the installed lifting equipment is not fit for purpose? An Actsafe portable battery powered winch, with a lifting capacity of 200Kg will ensure your maintenance teams can complete the task. This will reduce the risk of prolonged downtime. It also means it’s not necessary to have a permanent chain hoist fitted to

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In October 2016 PES brought you the newly baptised Vol au Vent. It has certainly been a winner for Jan de Nul, with ongoing projects and planned improvements to increase the crane’s capacity and available deck space. The Blyth Offshore Demonstrator Project During the third quarter of 2017, Jan De Nul Group’s vessel Vole au Vent will start the installation of 5 MHI Vestas 8.3 MW turbines at the Blyth Offshore Demonstrator Project. This new project is located 5.7km off the coast of Blyth, Northumberland, UK. The Jan De Nul Group was awarded the contract in March 2016 after FID was achieved by EDF Renewables UK. The Blyth Offshore Demonstrator wind farm will have an initially installed capacity of 41.5MW of electricity, which is enough to provide approximately 34,000 homes of renewable energy. Third in a row This project will be the third project in a row for the Vole au Vent since it was acquired by Jan De Nul Group in 2015. The previous projects were the Bligh Bank Phase II project and the Tahkoluoto project in Finland. By the time the new project starts, the two previous projects will have been completed.

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Project developers make huge financial investments in their solar parks. They therefore need to be sure that they are investing in the right products – products that are innovative, durable and reliable, guaranteeing maximum power output, year after year after year. As a renowned materials supplier, DSM offers several advanced solar solutions, which now also include fluorine-free durable backsheets and an innovative anti-soiling coating. The latter innovation in particular aims to help project developers and investors boost their internal rate of return (IRR). PES meets up again with Jan Grimberg, Business Director DSM Advanced Solar, to talk about recent trends in the industry and the company’s latest launches in the solar market. PES: Could you briefly introduce DSM and the role it plays in the solar industry? Jan Grimberg: DSM is a globally operating science-based company that focuses on health, nutrition and materials. We’re active in renewable energy in a number of fields, with DSM Advanced Solar focusing specifically on developing technologies and materials that increase the efficiency, stability and sustainability of solar modules at every stage of the value chain. We have been the leading player in anti-reflective coatings for a while and we’ve recently launched a new anti-soiling coating for PV

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As the PV market is growing, so also is the need for more reliable measurements. Because the output power of every module should be measured in production and as the resulting power class affects the selling price, inaccurate measurements lead to money loss. Other tests on the quality of PV modules are also performed based on the needs of the end user and because of market regulation. These include, for example, electroluminescence imaging, electrical safety testing of the modules and visual inspection. Key aspects in reliable measurements are high quality testing equipment and information on their actual performance, ease of use and level of automation. Finland based Endeas Oy has been manufacturing solar simulators since 2001. A global clientele has proven that QuickSun solar simulators are a key part in highly efficient production lines. QuickSun 550CE is the latest high-end testing station that can perform all necessary tests to prove PV modules from production are of high quality. Standards International standards give the mandatory testing requirements. They tell which kinds of tests should be performed and what kind of equipment should be used for the tests. International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC)[1] prepares standards for the PV industry. These include safety standards on the construction

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Dr. Michael Fuß, CEO, MBJ Solutions, gives PES an insight in to the development of their spectrum of inspection systems, simulation and measurement tools. Asia is an important market to them. PES: Welcome to PES Solar. Would you like to introduce your company and explain a little about how you serve the solar industry? Dr. Michael Fuß: MBJ Solutions was founded in 2009 with the idea of building automated electroluminescence inspection systems. The company is located in Hamburg, Germany. Since the beginning MBJ has focused on the PV industry, to which we are supplying electroluminescence inspection solutions for the module production process and have sold more than 300 inspection systems worldwide. PES: MBJ Solutions offers a range of simulation and measurement tools, inspection systems and more. What is currently most in demand from the market? Why is this? MF: In 2009 we started with the focus on electroluminescence inspection. At this time the major goal was to increase the product quality. Over time we have added a couple of features to the systems: dark-iv curve measurement, diode check and cell distance measurement. Most of these features were initiated by the customers to increase the level of automatisation and speed. The trend to higher

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PES hears from Stephen L. Prince, President & CEO at Younicos, about the adaptability and different complexities associated with the use of batteries by commercial and industrial energy users. Despite being a relatively new technology, energy storage has already traveled a long and impressive path on the road to full-scale commercialization. It started with niche applications and the provision of very specific ancillary services to stabilize the grid. Now, however, batteries are being adopted much more broadly – making full use of their versatility, which is a defining factor of energy storage systems. In fact, it’s this versatility that makes them ideally suited for commercial and industrial (C&I) energy users - with or without co-located, renewable self-generation. That sounds good - from 30,000 feet in the air. But how exactly can C&I energy users address their energy needs through batteries? While individual use cases differ by geography and the specific energy needs of each user, all fall within what I like to call the “golden triangle” of C&I energy storage: price reduction, extra revenues and increased resilience. Let’s look at each in some detail: The first, and I suppose most obvious, application of commercial energy storage is the reduction of peak consumption

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There is a change at the top at Studer Innotec and PES met up with the new managing director, Matthew Anderson to get his vison of the future from his office in Switzerland. PES: Welcome to PES Solar/PV magazine. Thanks for talking with us. Would you like to begin by explaining a little about the background of your organisation and how you currently serve the solar/PV industry? Matthew Anderson: Studer Innotec was founded in 1987 by Mr Roland Studer in Valais, Switzerland. Mr Studer recognised a need for high-quality power electronics for off-grid power applications and began by supplying solutions for off-grid residences in the Alps. The products quickly gained a reputation for their reliability and robustness, and Studer Innotec began exporting internationally and to a wide range of markets including grid backup, mobile, telecom and industrial applications. As the PV industry grew, and grid-connected PV became the largest market at the start of the century, Studer Innotec intentionally focused on the applications it knows best: battery based systems. Now, as battery storage increases in grid connected applications, our products are seeing a huge increase in applications. Over the coming decade, we expect the products supplied for off-grid, poor grid, and grid-connected

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