Power & Energy Solutions

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With the continuous progression of the offshore wind industry we find more operators than ever searching for effective and efficient solutions to their operations. In the wind energy sector, modular units can be placed on a huge variety of vessels and barges to accommodate the manpower required during the commissioning phase of the projects. Accommodation modules are designed to interface with the control rooms, which enables great flexibility when it comes to last minute changes in projects and the varying requirements for staff. They host a range of benefits, as shown below. Fast and efficient With the palpable shift towards sustainable/renewable energy across the global industry, more organisations are opting for swift modifications on all types of fixed installations in order to keep-pace with the ongoing demand. In previous years, many of these organisations believed to have ample time to prepare for the next energy revolution, with long-term, extensive and costly new builds for their projects. However, we now find that in order to keep up, rapid conversions of existing vessel types, with the support of modular units is proving to be the way forward. As we know, a new build can be very expensive, with a long lead time to manufacture. When

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Compared to all other vessel type markets worldwide, the Crew Transport Vessel (CTV) is developing the fastest. According to MHO&Co A/S, the perfect CTV has yet to be built and as soon as the next generation is launched, there will be new requirements from a forever developing business. PES was intrigued and went to find out more from, Mik Henriksen, CEO and Dan Knudsen, COO. It is really interesting to see all the variations that are being built and the different philosophies used by various designers and builders. We have been involved in vessel design for more than 20 years, and it is fantastic to work on transfers to wind farms, where every month new turbines and concepts are being developed. There are many factors that a client needs to consider when choosing a CTV for a project: safety, operation limitations, comfort, fuel economy, cargo carrying capacity, speed and the day rate, amongst others. The CTV market has had a few hard years, following on from a some really good years, we are hopeful that the lessons learned during the hard years, will make all involved a bit more careful. MHO&Co A/S, has chosen to focus on larger CTVs, as wind farms are being

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Wind energy is proven to be a reliable way of producing clean renewable energy, and the net inflow of financial investors reflects that the industry has matured. Wind energy is clean and safe and simply constitutes a smart investment. The business will, however, see some challenges going forward. Generating new electricity has always depended on national support schemes whether it has been carbon-based or generated by renewable sources. Wind and solar will be the first renewable technologies to break this barrier in reaching the point where they can operate continuously and profitably without public subsidy. To ensure business sustainability, it will be increasingly important to continue and develop further efforts to reduce investment requirements and operating costs. Wind turbines will continue to grow in size. The components and the forces applied to the turbines will continue to grow. Which is why increasing our knowledge and understanding of how turbines operate and function is the key to reducing costs, especially as the wind business enters a critical transformative period. Integrated operations Data is increasingly driving the understanding of wind farms and their day-to-day operations. Various control and monitoring systems are available for all aspects of a wind turbine, from planned maintenance to lifecycle

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The offshore industry is now recognising the potential of utilising hybrid power linked to innovative propulsion systems. However, the cost of adopting hybrid technology on retrofit projects and new vessels requires a viable business case to justify higher capital expenditure (CAPEX). Offshore maritime cannot afford to go ‘green’ for no reason; there simply is not the margin to add on another layer of costs. They need a viable business case or they need a compliance case. Which raises the burning question - how can the offshore sector finance hybrid marine power? Other transport sectors around the world are successfully utilising hybrid systems. Automotive manufacturers including Tesla and BMW are re-defining energy possibilities for land transport. The technology is transitioning from high performance automobiles to city busses and the future of aviation. Technology Readiness Level (TRL) is rated 1 to 9. Component parts of maritime hybrid powertrains typically achieve TRL8. By definition this is, ‘actual system completed and qualified through test and demonstration’. But maritime needs to move up to TRL9, ‘actual system proven through successful mission operations’. Emissions Compliance versus Engineering Efficiency Dramatically reducing pollution in both water and air, particularly in ports and around people to maintain their health, is becoming the most significant driver for change

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Offshore wind is all the rage right now, competing without subsidies, floating into deeper waters with new foundation designs and bigger turbines. For all its promise, however, offshore wind remains mostly a European affair, with more than 15 gigawatts of capacity installed in European waters by the end of 2017 and less than two gigawatts elsewhere. Slowly but surely the picture is beginning to change. The US, and Asian countries including Taiwan, are progressing ambitious offshore wind plans. Leading European energy companies want to benefit from this ambitious mood. PES invited Vladimir Nicolaas, innogy Head of Offshore Growth & New Business, and Chris Willow, innogy Business Development Manager Offshore Wind, to give an insight into innogy’s global offshore growth aspirations. With more than 1,000 megawatt of installed capacity (pro rata), innogy is one of the world’s leading operators of offshore wind farms, trailblazing the industry since 2004. Together with investment partners, the company owns seven operational wind farms off the UK, German and Belgian coasts. ‘Our strong European footprint is the backbone for our global growth plans,’ Chris explained. ‘Our aim is to actively pursue and unlock opportunities worldwide,’ Vladimir added. ‘We plan to do this by entering into partnerships with

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For a long time we at PES have been saying that components in the wind industry are getting bigger and bigger and obviously this includes the tools of the trade. How much more increase can there be in size and how does this affect the weight? Huisman from the beginning Before looking at the developments in the wind industry, let’s take a closer look at Huisman, one of the manufacturers of offshore wind tools and cranes, and start at the beginning. Huisman, founded in 1929 and was originally a construction company for steel structures and derricks. In 1987 Huisman joined forces with engineering company ITREC to develop steel construction projects entirely under its own management. In 1983, during the early ITREC days, the mast crane concept was developed: a compact and innovative crane design for heavy offshore lifts: the Heavy Lift Mast Crane. Another important development from the early days is Active Heave compensation. Currently, this system is also delivered in an electric version, with frequency controlled motors. Unlike in the second half of the eighties, when everyone considered 300m water depth to be extremely deep, indeed nowadays, we consider this to be shallow water. With innovation being at the heart of the

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PES asked Steve Sawyer, Secretary General at GWEC for his outlook on the future of the wind industry markets. Will prices continue to fall or have they reached their lowest point? Where is the market increasing? Where is it slowing down? Read on and find out… The global wind power market remained above 50 GW in 2017, with Europe, India and the offshore sector all having record years. Chinese installations were down - 19.66 GW - but the rest of the world made up for most of that. Total installations in 2017 were 52,492 MW, bringing the global total to 539,123 MW. The annual market was in fact down 3.8% on 2016’s 54,642 MW; and the cumulative total is up 11% over 2016’s year-end total of 487,219 MW. The offshore segment had a record year with 4,331 MW of installations, an 87% increase on the 2016 market, bringing total global installations to 18,814 MW, and representing a 30% increase in cumulative capacity globally. Offshore was about 8.4% of the 2017 annual market, and represents about 3.5% of cumulative installed capacity, but it’s growing quickly. Total new investment in clean energy rose to US$ 333.5bn (€296.8bn1) in 2017, up 3% over 2016, but still

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PES once again brings you an inside preview, this time of Global Offshore Wind 2018. Don’t miss out, book your tickets and come along to the biggest offshore conference of 2018. The industry is currently on a high and there is expectancy in the air. Offshore wind has massive potential. But what are the pathways to growth, what will it do for your country, and what does the industry look like as offshore wind becomes a core part of the global energy system? One thing is clear, transformation is coming. Are you ready for rapid growth, disruption, new ways of working, and acceleration of technology? Are you ready to play your part in the industry’s global ambition? Prepare for change at Global Offshore Wind 2018. Global Offshore Wind 2018 is the year’s largest dedicated offshore wind conference and exhibition taking place from June 19th – 20th at Manchester Central. This global event is organised by RenewableUK in partnership with industry leaders Equinor, innogy, MHI Vestas Offshore Wind, ORE Catapult and Scottish Power Renewables. The future of offshore wind Bloomberg New Energy Finance anticipates that the global offshore wind market will grow to 115GW by 2030 – a six-fold increase in 12 years! The opportunities

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The rapid market expansion, in offshore generated wind power, requires a new approach towards offshore access for maintenance of wind generators. Two experts in access systems, Willem Prins and Marco Klitsie, developed a totally new and patented access method for which solid investors and building partners have already been found. The EAGLE-ACCESS SYSTEM will be ready for trials in early 2019 and so PES wanted to know more… Background Looking back on 15 years of experience in consultancy and the design and development of access systems for offshore platforms for several clients in the market, we conclude the present technology is far from mature. There are still more technical steps to be made, especially in the offshore wind market. A short history By the end of the 20th century the offshore oil and gas industry felt the need for cheaper access for personnel to platforms, replacing the expensive use of helicopters, which was also driven by the trend towards smaller and unmanned platforms. In 2003 the first proposals for access from PSV’s to platforms came to light and two competing access systems were introduced to the market: OAS by Offshore Solutions and Ampelmann. Both systems accommodated the access for personnel from DPII supply vessels to

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Lindø Industrial Park saves time and manpower by replacing heavy polyester slings with lightweight Dynamica SafeLift slings manufactured in Dyneema®. The industrial park on Funen has a great experience with the handling and shipping of large components for the offshore and heavy industry. The industrial zone in Odense is, amongst other things, a collection point and a storage depot for jackets for offshore wind turbine foundations. Jackets are 63m tall steel structures with a weight of up to 665t per piece. This figure corresponds to the weight of 27 fully loaded lorries! A gantry crane with a capacity of 1,000 t is used several times, both to gather the jackets and then to move them around for storage or shipping. The process involves lifting of so-called 3D structures, which have a height of 55m and a weight of approx. 500t per piece, where rigging needs to be done at a height of some 50 or 60m. A lifting sling is lowered down along the foot of a jacket, pulled underneath two stiffs, and then guided back up to the beam. Lindø Industrial Park has used polyester slings for this type of lifting until very recently. In this case a standard polyester sling had

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