Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

The global power cable provider NKT believes an even stronger focus on sustainability is emerging in the offshore industry to meet the global demand for renewable energy. The company is continuously investing in projects ensuring sustainability in all areas of its offshore operations and has already seen its energy efficient cable-laying vessel play an important part for customers and partners in the offshore industry. In a globalised and interconnected world, the need for power is constantly growing with a global focus on meeting the demand in a sustainable and efficient way. The transformation towards more sustainable energy production has a great impact on the offshore energy sector, with a growing focus on ensuring even more sustainable operations. As a turnkey provider of high-voltage cables systems to renewable energy projects in the offshore industry, NKT is now experiencing an increased interest in sustainability from partners operating in the industry. ‘We have seen a growing interest for sustainability in the entire supply chain from cable system design to production, installation and service from our partners in the offshore industry,’ says Andreas Berthou, Executive Vice President and Head of High-voltage Solutions in NKT. ’It is only natural with an increased focus on energy efficiency and sustainability and

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Pant y Maen is a recently consented seven turbine wind farm site in Denbighshire, North Wales. To say the site had a history in relation to wind farm planning would be an understatement. In 2005 the Welsh Assembly Government issued spatial planning policy for large scale onshore wind in Wales (TAN8) which identified seven strategic search areas (SSA), deemed suitable for such developments and with the optimistic target that 800MW would be consented and built within five years. This site lies within the northernmost SSA and is a commercial conifer plantation. In 2007 another developer submitted a planning application for a wind farm called Gorsedd Brân, consisting of 13 turbines up to 125m tip height. The application was refused by Denbighshire County Council (DCC) in February 2008. The decision was appealed by the developer with a slightly amended layout and the appeal dismissed in November 2009. The initial refusal by DCC was on the basis of landscape and visual effects, noise, flooding and ecology. Flooding and ecology issues were resolved with DCC prior to appeal. The appeal was dismissed on the grounds of ‘visual effects of the proposal both within the locality and from more distant views, such as from the Clwydian Range

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In this day and age when downtime prevention, maintenance and cost reductions are key, remote surveillance must be one of the top ways to improve all three. PES went to find out the latest developments from Moventas who have remote surveillance centres in Finland, Italy, UK and the US to monitor over 2,500 wind turbines globally. The Moventas Condition Management System (CMaS) gathers critical data on turbines in operation, which is analysed by a team of experts to help ward off unexpected failures. CMaS operates on all gearbox types. Thus Moventas provides surveillance for turbines deploying a range of different gearbox brands. A broader view of the whole drivetrain with CMaS and its intelligent sensors CMaS was developed to monitor how the gearbox and other drivetrain components in a wind turbine perform. It anticipates possible upcoming failures and it guarantees the continuity of their energy yield. Traditional condition monitoring products focused mainly on measuring vibrations from rotating components. CMaS, on the other hand, is based on a profound understanding of the various failure modes of the drivetrain as whole. For example, it is possible for early changes in oil lubrication properties to be visible, long before they can be measured in vibration. CMaS technologies

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With increasing competitiveness of renewable energy compared to traditional forms of power production, Power Purchase Agreements are becoming attractive for both off-takers as well as power producers. However, PPAs bring along a new risk dimension requiring profound expertise in the wind energy business. Theresia Langosz-Römbell, Organisation Development, CSR & Communications Manager at Luxcara, provides PES with a glimpse into the new, wind energy world. It is no new story that wind conditions are even more difficult to predict than sun-shine. So far, under the feed-in tariff (FiT) or similar subsidised schemes, no target amount of produced energy was agreed. Strong wind leading to a peak in production did not cause any substantial problems in terms of remuneration. Since the FiT was guaranteed by national governments, the additional power was taken off with the same conditions as the average amount. And even short-term underperformance was no real cause for worry, as nobody relied on this specific amount of renewable energy. That is until now. We are leaving the FiT times behind. European countries are substantially reducing subsidisation. Leaving aside auctions ending at a price of zero, Spain is in the process of abolishing all kinds of subsidies of renewable energy. We are entering the age

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The UK’s offshore wind sector is racing ahead. With the offshore wind market rapidly expanding, the demand for equipment and services to support its growth is sure to rise with it. The UK is the leader in offshore wind production as well as having an established track record in exporting physical manufactured products. Is there a golden opportunity to be the world’s supplier of choice? This will depend on its ability to invest in its workforce and innovation, and on the extent to which the industry can pursue a culture of collaboration. These factors will be vital if UK firms are to support and make the best of local workforces and their supply chains around the world. A strong position Thanks to its North Sea heritage, the UK already has a globally-renowned manufacturing and knowledge base for the offshore energy industry. The oil and gas sector has long had a wealth of exceptional engineering talent, with extensive experience in and understanding of offshore projects. Alongside this comes a manufacturing capability and infrastructure, geared towards the offshore sector. This was useful when manufacturing new technology, and many technologies were actually translatable into the new sector. For example, at JDR we first entered the offshore

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The Jan De Nul Group has installed two gravity-based foundations in the Danish waters of the Baltic Sea. Built in Ostend, the foundations were designed entirely by Jan De Nul, based on their client’s basic design. PES wanted to learn more about this ground breaking wind farm. By 2021, the 600MW Kriegers Flak Offshore Wind Farm in the Danish waters of the Baltic Sea, will generate enough electricity to power up to 600,000 homes. Transmission grid operators, Danish Energinet and German 50 Hertz, will connect the Kriegers Flak OWF with the German Baltic 2 OWF, thereby creating the first offshore power grid in the world to combine two offshore wind power installations with the possibility of supplying electricity to either or both, Denmark and Germany. The power grid part of the project is co-financed by the EU. The Kriegers Flak wind farm consists of two sites, each with its own high voltage substation. The Jan De Nul Group, together with its consortium partner Iemants, were responsible for the foundations supporting both these substations. The contract to design, build and install these two Gravity Based Substructures (GBSs) was awarded to the consortium during late 2016. Jan De Nul was in charge of the design,

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Rick van der Lelij, Operations Manager at Height Specialists, dropped in to PES to talk about the importance of safety and training beyond the legal requirements. It makes for interesting reading and it’s reassuring to know companies are more and more determined to keep their employees safe by doing more than the necessary minimum. PES: Welcome back to PES Wind magazine. Thanks for talking with us. For the benefit of our new readers would you like to begin by explaining a little about the background of Height Specialists and the importance of the wind industry to you? Rick van der Lelij: Height Specialists was founded 24 years ago and since then has grown to be one of the biggest IRATA companies in the Benelux region. With a staff of over 40 people employed full time, Height Specialists is a leading company in the use of rope access techniques, combined with industrial services. We are also a fully certified IRATA training company. We work throughout the Benelux region, both onshore and offshore. During the last couple of years Height Specialists has started to shift its focus a bit more from oil and gas towards the wind industry. As a growing market the wind industry

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The Global Wind Energy Council released its annual market statistics on 14 February from Brussels. The 2017 market remained above 50 GW, with Europe, India and the offshore sector having record years. Chinese installations were down slightly – ‘only’ 19.5 GW - but the rest of the world made up for most of that. Total installations in 2017 were 52,573 MW, bringing the global total to 539,581 MW. The annual market was in fact down 3.8% on 2016’s 54,642 MW; and the cumulative total is up 11% over 2016’s year-end total of 487,657 MW. The offshore segment had a record year with 4,331 MW of installations, an 87% increase on the 2016 market, bringing total global installations to 18,814 MW, representing a 30% increase in cumulative capacity globally. Offshore is still less than 10% of the global annual market, and represents only about 3.5% of cumulative installed capacity, but it’s growing quickly. Beyond the statistics, however, is the fact that wind power is in a rapid transition to becoming a fully commercialised, unsubsidised technology; successfully competing in the marketplace against heavily subsidised fossil and nuclear incumbents. The transition to fully commercial market-based operation has meant that the industry is going through a period

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Since the beginning of this year, US states together have committed to approximately 8,200 MW of offshore wind by 2030. This is a substantial amount of work and provides a visible pipeline of work justifying investments in dedicated and efficient installation solutions. Are these the right conditions to invest in a new build installation jack-up? PES explores the opportunities and hurdles with GustoMSC, a design and engineering company of mobile offshore units and equipment. There is an increasing interest from companies looking to participate in the US offshore wind installation market. Various parties are investigating and preparing in order to be able to invest in the construction of a wind turbine installation jack-up in the future. Parties are considering designs, potential shipyards and discussing with developers and turbine manufacturers. There have been several announcements but to date no company appears to have made a solid commitment to build yet. What are the bottlenecks why are commitments not forthcoming? Last year, the States of Massachusetts, New York and Rhode Island published a report ‘U.S. Jones Act Compliant Offshore Wind Turbine Installation Vessel Study’. GustoMSC has been working on this report for the New York State Energy Research and Development Agency (NYSERDA). The report is

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The state of flux in the UK’s onshore wind sector has never been more apparent than at present. On the one hand, wind energy and other renewable energy sources are currently generating over a quarter of power consumption across the UK annually, at a price cheaper than gas and nuclear, all while enjoying the highest level of public support. At the same time, however, national policy and regulatory backing is at a particularly low ebb, and investor confidence has been dented to such a degree that the pipeline for new development has largely stalled. Recent years have seen the cessation of both the Renewables Obligation (RO) scheme and Contract for Difference (CfD) support for onshore renewables, coupled with the rapid degression of Feed-in-Tariff (FiT) payments for all renewables prior to its phase-out in March 2019. These support mechanisms enabled a staggering build-out of onshore wind capacity equal to nearly 5GW since 2012, with some 2.6GW of new generation installed in 2017 alone. In combination, onshore and offshore wind contributed approximately 45% of the UK’s total renewables capacity, resulting in some 37,400 megawatt hours of annual generation. This is roughly equivalent to the domestic power consumption of 12 million homes, offsetting in the range of

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