Power & Energy Solutions

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As head of one of the ‘greenest companies' in America, Pall's Keith Webb has a duty not only to his stakeholders, but also to the global community as a whole. It's a responsibility he ably administers, driven by a zeal for innovation and corporate success. Here, he tells PES about the company's rapid growth, its creative technological developments, and its focus on European operations.PES: Welcome back to PES magazine, can you tell us how your company has been performing within the wind market since we last spoke?KW: Pall Corporation's wind energy business has grown tremendously over the past few years. Sales, to this application, doubled last year. We have expanded our reach away from our traditional European base towards America and Asia. The key wind turbine application currently in our portfolio is the protection of the turbine gearbox lubrication system for bearings and gears. Pall filters are also used to protect the hydraulic systems inside the nacelle. PES: And how much of your total business is now dedicated to wind energy? Is this still an area in which you wish to see continued growth?KW: From one per cent five years ago, wind energy is fast approaching 10 per cent of

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A 176 year-old-operation, Rickmers-Linie is a member of the Hamburg-based Rickmers Group and provides a worldwide network of liner services for the transportation of breakbulk, heavylift and project cargoes such as transformers, generators, railway locomotives - and of course, wind turbines. PES once again caught up with the company's Director of Marketing and Sales, Gerhard Janssen.PES: Welcome back to PES magazine. For the benefit of readers who might not be familiar with your company, can you explain a little about your operation and how you serve the wind industry?Gerhard Janssen: Rickmers-Linie is a leading liner carrier specialised for the transportation of breakbulk, heavylift and project cargoes. We operate a Round-The-World Pearl String Service, which connects the industrial centres of the world on an eastbound rotation with fortnightly departures.Furthermore, we have a service from Europe to the Middle East and India, as well as the services in the Pacific, which are the westbound service from the US East Coast via the Panama Canal to Northern China, South Korea and Japan, as well as our brand new NCS Service linking Japan, South Korea and China with ports on the Northern Coast of South America, in the Caribbean and finally Philadelphia.PES: What's the

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The views on offshore wind projects are as divided as can be, so the slightly polemic title of this article is probably appropriate. There are some who argue that offshore wind is the way to go, and to go now. And there are others who argue that offshore wind is too expensive and too risky and that, anyway, there are sufficient onshore sites left that should be developed for wind energy first. As so often, both sides have valid points. This article will look at some of these.Current SituationOffshore wind has undergone an interesting development but one cannot say that it was a rapid development. After the first large and (truly far) offshore project at Horns Rev offshore wind project development appeared to be on good course. Germany and the UK identified huge potential for offshore projects in their waters and it appeared to be only a question of (little) time before the North Sea would be crawling with turbines. Alas, these high hopes were only partially met. The UK has, by now, almost 1GW offshore wind installed and another 2GW have been consented. Germany however, long thought to be the vanguard of offshore wind, like she was wind onshore,

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Transporting wind power components by ship requires a lot of expertise and experience. Employing its own team of experts with many years of specialist knowledge in this arena, shipbroker COLI provides the appropriate tonnage - made-to-measure for all cargo components, including complete wind turbines.When the ship intended to carry the cargo ties up at the port of loading, the majority of the work done by the COLI team has already been completed, even though the loading procedures are yet to begin. That's because during the initial bidding phase, the experts of the company's "Wind Desk" will have already gone through all the important and relevant questions associated with the shipment.The COLI Wind Desk is a team of employees who specialise in wind power components. The Wind Desk with a focus on European shipments is located in Bremen, and the company also has a Wind Desk in Hamburg that focuses on worldwide shipments. Furthermore, each member of the team concentrates on a particular manufacturer, since products differ even though they belong to the same group of goods.By setting up these teams of experts many years ago, COLI has responded to the emerging and increasing significance of wind power and the resulting

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The UK has just entered into an historic period of coalition government, which promises to throw the nation's hard-fought wind power policies into disarray. The coalition governments of Germany, Italy and Austria on the other hand, are forging ahead with inspired legislation, which may shine a light on Britain's efforts. However, until these governments' pioneering policies are recognised, it seems that the UK will continue to flounder

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A recent study to quantify renewable energy deployment in North America by the US-based National Academies of Science found that, in terms of national wind power potential, Russia came way ahead of its nearest rivals, with more than 118 Pwh (Petawatt hours). Next on the list was Australia, with a meagre-looking 86 Pwh. No wonder, perhaps, that investors are beginning to gaze over Russia's famed steppes and shorelines at a bottomless natural resource that has been barely harnessed.But despite the favourable natural conditions and attractiveness of wind power there are still no huge wind farms, nor single wind farms around the rural villages and suburban areas in Russia, a situation the Russian Association of Wind Power Industry (RAWI) would like to see rectified in the very near future.RAWI president Igor Bryzgunov certainly thinks so. "Today we see a trend of serious investors' involvement in wind power industry," he said. "It's not surprising, since Russia has the world's largest potential for wind energy development."Of that, there is no doubt. Some 40 billion kWh of electricity could be generated by Russian wind farms every year, so the implementation of large and small wind power plants in the vast Russian spaces would be

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The first offshore wind park globally was installed in Denmark in 1991. Since then the offshore wind energy market has been developing slowly. Currently, majority of the installations in Europe are located in Denmark and the UK, countries that possess rich wind resources. There is no doubt that offshore installations offer higher productivity when compared with terrestrial turbines mainly due to higher wind speeds and more stable wind speeds. On average, wind speeds in the sea exceed 9-10m/s, which are significantly higher than average wind speeds of 6m/s on land.Offshore wind energy development in EuropeSince 1991, the offshore wind power market has been developing moderately to reach slightly above 2,000 MW by the end of 2009, representing close to 3% of total wind energy projects installed in Europe. The European Wind Energy Association (EWEA) expects this to grow to over 21,000 MW by 2016. The drivers that will be responsible for this high growth are mainly related to government support and setting new goals for renewable energy contribution to final energy production. In 2009, Directive 2009/28/WE was established, setting a new target of sourcing 20% of total energy production in the EU from renewable energy, with individual targets for every

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118 new offshore wind turbines were fully connected to the grid in the first half of 2010 according to new statistics released by the European Wind Energy Association (EWEA). PES takes a closer look at the trends and figures behind the headlines in this exclusive report.Top-line statsIn the first six months of 2010, 118 offshore wind turbines were fully grid connected totalling 333 MW.Overall, 16 offshore wind farms totalling 3,972 MW were under construction. The following work was carried out on those wind farms in the first six months of 2010:• 118 turbines were fully grid connected1 totalling 333 MW in six farms: Rødsand and Poseidon in Denmark, Alpha Ventus in Germany, Gunfleet Sands, Robin Rigg and Thanet in the UK• 263 turbines were installed (151 of which are awaiting grid connection totalling 440 MW) in seven farms: Belwind in Belgium, Rødsand and Poseidon in Denmark, BARD Offshore I in Germany, Greater Gabbard, Gunfleet Sands and Thanet in the UK• 163 foundations were installed in nine farms: Belwind in Belgium, Rødsand and Poseidon in Denmark, Baltic I and BARD Offshore I in Germany, Greater Gabbard, Sheringham Shoal, Thanet and Walney I in the UK• Four offshore wind farms became fully

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