Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

Damen Shipyards Group has recently announced a new design. The Fast Crew Supplier (FCS) 3410 service accommodation and transfer vessel (SATV) contains numerous design features that ensure its suitability for operations in the developing offshore wind market in North America.  The design of the new vessel builds on the success of proven Damen designs that have earned themselves an outstanding reputation in the European renewables market. The premise of the design is the Damen Twin Axe bow design. The Axe Bow, a patented design that allows the vessel to cut through waves instead of slamming, significantly improves seakeeping and onboard comfort. Damen’s FCS 2610 optimised this seakeeping behaviour by combining the Axe Bow with a catamaran hull form. The FCS 2610 was heralded as a game changer in the offshore renewables industry in Europe and went on to sell over 45 vessels. Damen has recently developed this theme further with the FCS 2710 – a new FCS vessel one metre longer than its predecessor and, significantly, with an additional metre in water clearance, enabling the vessel safely extended operational windows.  The FCS 3410 further develops this evolutionary theme, tailoring the concept to meet the requirements of the emerging US offshore renewables market, as

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The offshore wind market in the U.S. is about to take off and there are enormous growth projections. For the installation of the first wave of U.S. wind parks starting in 2020, European built and operated installation jack-ups will be needed, because currently no U.S. built jack-ups have the capacity to install the turbines. Nor will this type of equipment be built in time in the U.S. PES takes a closer look at the options. There are plans to build installation jack-ups in the U.S., but it is likely that these will only kick-off after the first wind farms prove to be a success. Aside from this, the infrastructure of the U.S. ports is not suitable for these big vessels, there are bridges and hurricane breakers preventing the jack-up installation vessels to enter or leave the harbors. New hubs and ports will have to be developed before U.S. flagged installation jack-ups will become a practical tool for the installation of the parks. The problem with using European installation jack-ups, apart from the a fore mentioned infrastructural problems, is the Jones Act. The Jones Act requires vessels transporting merchandise from U.S. point to U.S. point to be U.S. manned, built, flagged and owned.

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Van Oord is a leading global contractor in dredging, offshore oil and gas and offshore wind, and is celebrating its 150th anniversary this year. The company has a long and varied history in marine engineering, an industry that has its origins in the Netherlands. Over the past 150 years Van Oord, a family-owned business, has grown into one of the largest marine engineering companies in the world. The origins of Dutch marine engineering lie in the Netherlands’ unique location on the North Sea and its centuries-long battle against the water. Van Oord’s work is rooted in that battle. The history of the company is intertwined with the country’s biggest marine engineering projects, including the Nieuwe Waterweg Canal, the Delta Works, and the Port of Rotterdam’s Maasvlakte II expansion. These were projects that fuelled economic growth and kept the Dutch population safe from flooding. Since the late nineteenth century, the company has also applied its expertise abroad. Van Oord extended the port of Surabaya, constructed the Palm Islands in Dubai, dredged the Suez Canal, and installed the Gemini offshore wind park. They have gained a great deal of knowledge and experience over the years, and the company has grown to become one

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Our renewable electricity energy needs are growing in a world that is constantly evolving. The market requires more renewable energy for less money. The reduction of government subsidies means that the industry needs to start looking for ways to increase its efficiency. More energy for less money There are different possibilities for lowering the levelized cost of energy, such as avoiding unexpected downtimes (reducing the operational costs), extending the lifetime of the infrastructure, and increasing the power output. By integrating digital technology into the intelligent gearboxes developed by ZF Wind Power, customers will be able to improve all three aspects. Avoiding unexpected gearbox downtime The cost of an unexpected gearbox failure can be significant, especially when cranes or vessels are needed at short notice. Additionally, when certain spare parts are not available at the right time, it can cause significant turbine downtime. Thanks to digital technology, every gearbox will leave ZF Wind Power’s factory with its own unique digital birth certificate. The certificate contains all the gearbox manufacturing information and can be accessed online by ZF’s and partnered service organizations. This way, ZF’s service team can calculate the consumed lifetime of each bearing and gear pair within a gearbox, combining the actual measured loads with knowledge about

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This briefing is intended as an update on three key policy and case law developments that have taken place over the summer. 1 New European Court ruling – ‘Sweetman II’ On 25 July 2018, the Court of Justice of the European Union (the Court) delivered its ruling in the case of Edel Grace and Peter Sweetman v An Bord Pleanala, or ‘Sweetman II’ (also known by some in the industry as ‘People over Wind II’.) The judgment developed the position taken in People Over Wind and Peter Sweetman v Coillte Teoranta (‘Sweetman I’), delivered in April this year. The Court again focused on the interpretation of Article 6 of the Habitats Directive, which concerns the need for an appropriate assessment where a project is likely to have a significant effect on a site (onshore or offshore) designated as a special protection area or a special area of conservation (SPAs and SACs) The key question for the Court was at what point in the assessment under this Directive should mitigation measures be taken into account. Current practice relating to appropriate assessment is based on a four-stage approach. Briefly, these stages are: (i) Screening to establish whether a likely significant effect may exist on the integrity of a designated

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PES caught up with Carsten Kofoed, Managing Director & Hans Christian Hansen, Director of Operations at Vento Maritime, to find out more about this young company, with years of experience behind it. By following the weather and planning ahead it’s possible to make substantial savings in time and fuel and thus decrease costs. Offshore operators need to have an eye on the weather forecasts. PES: Welcome to you both to PES Wind magazine. Thanks for talking with us. Would you like to begin by explaining a little about the background and experience of Vento Maritime and the importance of the wind industry to you? Carsten Kofoed & Hans Christian Hansen: Vento Maritime is a Danish weather service company, which we founded in Copenhagen in January 2017. Together we have more than 20 years of experience in the maritime business, within meteorology, oceanography and operational MetOcean services. We are dedicated to helping maritime customers save time while, improving safety at sea. We are only into maritime weather. Our marine forecasters are dedicated meteorologists and are all WMO-certified, with years of experience in understanding the needs of maritime customers. The team is passionate about excellent customer service and the art of communicating meteorological and oceanographic

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On a European level, two significant breakthroughs were achieved in energy policy during the summer: the European target for the share of renewable energies in the electricity supply will be increased to 32 percent by 2030. In addition, EU-member states are obliged to submit detailed plans by the end of 2019 regarding the deployment of renewables to contribute to achieve the EU-wide target of 32 percent. This includes a five years’ visibility on future auction timetable and volumes. Member states cannot change their energy policies on a year-to-year basis, hence more reliability can be achieved for the companies and capital cost can be reduced, due to less regulatory risk. After the general election in Germany, it took quite a while to form a new government. An ambitious attempt to form a ‘Jamaica’-Coalition (Conservative-Black, Liberal-Yellow and Green) failed, so that a new version of the old government was formed by the Conservatives and the Social Democrats. Many hopes for an ambitious renewable, yet market-oriented energy policy were buried. In spite of the bleak expectations of most observers, the coalition agreement included some very ambitious cornerstones, such as a 65 percent target for renewable energies in the electricity sector, 4 GW extra volume for

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The much-celebrated inauguration of Vattenfall’s European Offshore Wind Deployment Centre (EOWDC) was a day 15 years in the making for the energy industry. PES brings you a unique report on this exciting, innovative project, not least because of the enormous challenges which had to be overcome and the awareness, ethos and on-going research into the environmental effects. Originally conceived by Aberdeen Renewable Energy Group (AREG) back in 2003, the pioneering EOWDC is now generating clean energy off the coast of the Granite City. On September 7, Scotland’s First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon and Vattenfall’s CEO Magnus Hall inaugurated Scotland’s largest offshore wind test and demonstration facility. Over 100 business leaders and dignitaries attended the offshore celebration which gave them the opportunity to see the wind farm up close. Through a series of innovations and cutting-edge technologies, the 11-turbine EOWDC will serve as a test and demonstration facility for offshore wind and lead the drive towards generating competitive wind power globally. In what was a major feat of engineering, all foundations and turbines were installed in the North Sea over a period of just nine weeks. For the first time in the UK, steel suction bucket foundations were paired with the world’s most powerful turbines

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André Moura, Founder and CEO of Pro-Drone, Integrated Solutions for the Inspection of Energy Infrastructure, sat down with PES to tell us his perspective on drone inspections and how his company differs from other players in the market. Their experience and strategy means this company is here to stay and remain one step ahead of the game. PES: Welcome PES Wind magazine. Thanks for talking with us. Would you like to begin by explaining a little about the background of Pro-Drone and how you currently serve the wind industry? André Moura: Pro-Drone was born out of our desire to contribute to the efficiency of the wind energy sector by modernising the blade inspection procedures and empowering asset owners by providing them with high quality data. Our team has a very diverse background including robotics, aeronautical engineering, computer science and data management systems. Founded in 2015, we have carried out inspections in Europe and South America totalling over 1500 blades over the last 8 months. Our aim is to be established globally by the end of 2018. PES: We were wondering why Pro-Drone decided to focus on wind turbine inspection with the UAVs? AM: I was involved with offshore maintenance operations of wind energy assets, which

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As recent zero-subsidy projects show, the cost of wind energy is decreasing at an impressive rate. Nonetheless, production and maintenance costs remain high compared with rival sectors. One key route to decreasing overheads is the effective use of performance data. In many similar industries, data is used to streamline maintenance systems and reduce O&M costs through real-time management and predictive systems. However, in the wind industry turbine performance data is often unavailable, meaning owners and operators are not free to make use of data-based efficiency increases. By far the largest contributor to OPEX costs in the wind industry is O&M-related expenditure, the majority of which is caused by unplanned maintenance (see Figure 1). Reducing the expenses that result from unplanned maintenance will be key to further reducing the overall levelized cost of energy (LCoE). Within the industry, there is growing acceptance that the best way to reduce unplanned maintenance is to switch from a reactive approach to a more predictive regime, using data-based approaches to better anticipate and respond to maintenance issues. Many, if not all, owners and operators are already investing in predictive maintenance solutions, such as improved SCADA data analytics, condition monitoring systems (CMS), and oil monitoring. Such techniques require

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