Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

By Lindsay Roberts, Senior Policy Manager, Scottish Renewables With two-thirds of the UK’s onshore capacity and an offshore sector now getting steel in the water, Scotland has long been a leading champion of the wind sector. The country is the birthplace of wind-powered electricity generation and the windiest place in Europe, with 25% of the continent’s offshore wind resource. Scotland has capitalised on that to deliver economic and environmental benefits across the country. The Conservative manifesto commitment to end new subsidy for onshore wind locked both it and large-scale solar – our two cheapest renewable energy technologies – out of the energy market. With costs continuing to fall, however, a report from Baringa Partners, commissioned by Scottish Renewables, found that the UK Government could deliver 1GW of new onshore wind capacity at no additional cost to consumers over and above the long-term wholesale price of power. The report’s conclusions are dependent on mature renewables being able to bid in future auctions for long-term contracts for clean electricity such as those offered to offshore wind and the new nuclear facility at Hinkley Point.

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Are there cheaper renewable energies out there? Does saving the planet mean we, the consumer has to pay more? The EU has set targets and the UK is offering incentives to companies who meet these targets. Find out what savings you can make whilst doing your bit to save the planet… Saving Money Whilst Saving the Planet: Solar Investment If you have been interested in saving money on your energy bills lately, both in the domestic and commercial environment, you have likely already looked at all of the options available to you on the switching company side of things. While this can help you in the long run, there’s one thing it doesn’t achieve: helping to save the planet in the process. Energy companies that rely mostly on fossil fuel energy are often the cheapest providers, and opting to turn to renewables could alleviate some of the damage your property could do to the environment. The EU has been aiming for a target of 20% of its energy to come from renewables across all member states, including a further 20% of cuts to greenhouse gases and carbon production. States are required to be collectively meeting these targets by 2020. 2014 saw a huge

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There are four basic elements necessary for successful wind farm development: sufficient wind resource, access to transmission, someone to purchase the power, and the appropriate land on which to site turbines. The first three parts of the equation either exist or they don't. It is the fourth element - the social aspect of dealing with landowners and working with communities - that is neither simple nor clear cut, as any developer working today will attest.While there are many definitions of ‘community engagement', at its core it is the commitment of one party to develop and implement a process that facilitates productive, two-way communication with a group or community that has a stake in the party's project. It is arguably the most important aspect of development - and it is no exaggeration to say that the quality of a developer's Community Engagement program can make or break a project. And it's not just the landowner who sites a turbine who is a stakeholder; every resident, local business owner, and municipal leader in the area has a stake in new local developments, wind or otherwise.The founder of the Centre for Risk Communications in New York, Dr. Vincent Covello, coined an oft-quoted line

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Renewable energy appears to be one of the areas that have been less affected by the financial market's turmoil and economic downturn. In fact, green energy is widely regarded as a fairly safe haven for investors in many countries, offering long-term prospects with low risk because of reliable technology, rated off-takers and attractive returns. Wind energy is still the favourite among the renewable options.With prices for fossil fuels increasing and pushing up electricity price, wind-generated electricity is becoming competitive in many parts of the world. There is of course debate on how to calculate such grid parity - the point at which green power has the same price tag as other power. There is also debate on whether to include into the calculation the cost of stand-by options such as coal or gas power, used to balance the grid during low wind speeds. But even in the worst case calculations wind generated power is becoming increasingly competitive - especially in areas with high wind speeds.Turbine costs, turbine supplyCosts for wind energy projects are dominated by the price of turbines, which constitute up to 75% of onshore project costs. For offshore projects, the share is much lower, probably about 40-50%,

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The UK and European renewable energy sector is currently undergoing a radical transformation, spearheaded by the increasing demand for a secure source of clean, home grown energy. Driven by strong government incentives and advancements in technology, the sector has matured over recent years and the barriers to entry for new investors are receding.In particular, the wind sub-sector has been responsible for the biggest shift in attitudes and the greatest attraction of proactive investment, having demonstrated its simplicity and proven renewable energy technology. These are key factors necessary to unlock project finance and support of the banks. However, the sector has not escaped the lack of confidence that has dogged the global financial markets, which has stifled funding and development.There have been numerous policies implemented by governments across Europe aimed at reversing this trend. In the UK, Ofgem recently highlighted the need for an estimated £200bn of investment in cleantech and renewables over the next 10 years. Renewable Obligation Certificates (ROCs) have been introduced, which provide large utility companies with a quota for sourcing their power from renewables.To address the dilemma of a funding shortfall at the small-scale research and development end of the scale, Feed in Tariffs (FITs) have been

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Adam Grainger, Global Head of Energy and Engineering, Networkers International plcThe renewable energy industry is growing rapidly as are the number of people employed within it. In order to give your business a competitive edge, it is becoming increasingly important to ensure you have appropriately skilled and motivated individuals within your organisation to compete effectively in the global renewable energy market place.With the day to day responsibilities of most hiring managers in the energy industry focussed elsewhere, it can be hard to dedicate the necessary time to recruit staff. If you get it wrong, and you are forced to replace an individual, the costs to your business can be vast. A recent study concluded that the cost of replacing an employee could be anything from 75 percent of the person's salary to an alarming 24 times the person's salary! So how do you go about identifying the right individual first time round?Identify your resource needsBefore hiring a new member of staff it is important that you consider the skills your business will need in order to function properly and complete the tasks at hand. In a growing industry, such as renewable energy it is important to ensure you have the

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