Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

Gerry Lalonde, CEO, Orenda Energy Solutions, tells PES how he feels wind energy could be exchanged from one location to another. This is certainly food for thought and could make a big difference to small turbine owners, or perspective owners with no space near their current location. One of the chief concerns facing the small/medium wind energy industry is a geographical one, based purely on supply and demand. Imagine a business located in the middle of an urban area that wishes to be self-sustaining with its own ‘green’ electricity supply. If the business is located in an area where there is little or no wind and local planning laws preclude them from siting a small turbine on the property, is there not a conversation to be had with Government, which leads to a relaxing of the rules whereby any business can buy and erect a turbine on a ‘wind-friendly’ landscape, in another part of the country and have access to the equivalent amount of generated energy by these turbines from the grid? Is this not a classic case of supply not being efficiently matched to demand? Current legislation prohibits an energy consumer based on the South Coast of England, to purchase a wind turbine

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New delivery contract for production machines signed First PVD coating machines for HJT ordered Contract includes SILEX II processing line Kahl am Main, November 27, 2017 - The SINGULUS TECHNOLOGIES AG (SINGULUS TECHNOLOGIES) continues to be successful in marketing production equipment for the manufacturing of heterojunction (HJT) high-performance solar cells. A few days ago, a delivery contract for a production line of the SILEX II type as well as the delivery of the new cathode sputtering system under the product name GENERIS PVD was signed. The still pending prepayment for this order is expected to be received shortly. New GENERIS PVD with high reproducibility and highest efficiency with low operating costs. SINGULUS TECHNOLOGIES has already assembled and delivered numerous vacuum coating machines for the use in the solar industry. With the new GENERIS PVD sputtering system SINGULUS TECHNOLOGIES transfers its know-how of these coating machines to the work area of heterojunction. The solar cells are automatically conveyed through the process chambers and are coated on both sides. The GENERIS PVD ensures a high level of uniformity in terms of layer thickness amid a level of reproducibility of the layer with highest efficiency and low operating costs. The GENERIS PVD was specifically

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Munich, 27 November 2017: BayWa r.e., a leading global renewable energy developer, service supplier, wholesaler and energy solutions provider, has sold its remaining portfolio of UK solar farms, totalling 75MW, to Greencoat Solar II LP, managed by Greencoat Capital. The portfolio includes the 45MW Bann Road solar farm, the largest solar farm realised so far in Northern Ireland and on the island of Ireland. It has a 15-year power purchase agreement (PPA) in place with SSE Airtricity, Northern Ireland’s second largest energy utility. The portfolio also includes six solar farms spread across England and Wales totalling 30MW. In all cases, BayWa r.e. will continue to provide ongoing expert operations and maintenance services to ensure maximum availability and yield optimisation of the plants. “We are extremely pleased to see our well-established relationship with Greencoat continue with the sale of these solar farms”. Comments Matthias Taft, Board Member of BayWa AG, responsible for the energy business. “We have established a highly desirable reputation for acquiring and developing some of the most successful renewable energy projects in Europe and through our operation and maintenance teams, ensuring they continue to operate at peak efficiency. This makes us attractive to developers looking to partner and investors looking to

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Meyer Burger Technology Ltd (SIX Swiss Exchange: MBTN) (the “Company”) announced today that it is launching a voluntary incentive offer to holders of the CHF 100 million 5.5% convertible bonds due 2020 issued by the Company (the “Bonds”) (the “Incentive Offer”). The Bonds, bearing ISIN number CH0253445131 and Ticker-Symbol MBT14, were issued on 17 September 2014 and amended by majority vote at a bondholder meeting on 25 November 2016. Acceptance of the Incentive Offer will allow Meyer Burger to save future interest payment and to convert the corresponding liability into equity early without incurring any additional dilution compared to a conversion after the next coupon payment date which is likely based on the current trading of the Bonds and the Shares. As further set out in the official offer document dated 27 November 2017, the Company offers to pay a cash incentive of CHF 250 per CHF 5,000 principal amount of the Bonds to holders of the Bonds who elect to exercise their right to convert their Bonds into Meyer Burger registered shares (“Shares”) at the prevailing conversion price in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Bonds (the “Terms of the Bonds”) during the period starting today and ending

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• These turbines -the G126-2.5 MW- will be the highest in Asia, with a tip height of 215 metres • The company has already installed 310 MW in this market since its entry in 2011, which is a half of total installed capacity Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy has achieved a new milestone in its positioning in Asia Pacific having secured its largest-ever contract in Thailand, a market in which it is the leading OEM, responsible for more than 50% of the country's total installed capacity. Specifically, Siemens Gamesa has reached an agreement with local developer for the supply of 103 of its G126-2.5 MW turbines (260 MW) at the Hanuman wind complex, being built in the province of Chaiyaphum, in northeast Thailand. This order also marks a new technical feat as it will entail the installation of Asia's highest wind turbines: with a tower height of 153 metres and a blade length of 62 metres, the turbines will stretch 215 metres tall. This marks a new record for Siemens Gamesa, which last summer completed the installation of 33 210-metre tall turbines, the previous record holders. “We are very proud to have secured this order which highlights our commercial strength and positions us as the leading

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Ingeteam, an independent global supplier of electrical conversion equipment, will present its full range of wind energy drive train products at the WindEurope Conference & Exhibition 2017, taking place later this month in Amsterdam. Exhibiting at booth #1D24, Ingeteam will showcase its power converters, generators, turbine controllers, Condition Monitoring Systems (CMS), Smart SCADA management systems, as well as O&M services for onshore and offshore wind farms. This year we are very proud to have reached the 40 GW converter delivery milestone after enjoying spectacular growth in our core markets. We are now firmly established as the world’s number one supplier of wind power converters and we have strengthened our international position in the Operation & Maintenance sector. On a global level, Ingeteam has doubled its maintained power compared to 2016, a figure which places its global portfolio at 12.1 GW. Ingeteam offers low and medium voltage power converters up to 15 MW for onshore and offshore applications, optimized for DFIG and FC topologies. Full power converters specifically designed for each generator technology (PMG, IG, EESG) and air cooled, air/water cooled and full water cooled solutions for harsh environments, achieving industry-leading efficiency and reliability.   Indar offers a comprehensive range of wind generators, manufactured in

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Words: Sasaenia P. Oluwabunmi, Kayode E. Oluwabunmi & Athanasios J. Kolios Abstract: The development of adequate energy sources to satisfy the ever increasing energy demand in the world has led to the deployment of several offshore energy installations. Offshore Oil & Gas and renewable energy installations have had a lot of growth in recent years; this growth has led to an increase in the accompanying risks and challenges faced by these industries especially regarding policy implementation. Thus, it is pertinent to assess all the risks in the offshore energy industry, to create a ‘feed-in base’ applicable to both offshore renewables and offshore oil and gas industries. This paper analyses all the risks in the offshore energy industry in relation to policy through Failure Mode and Effects (FMEA) analysis using Risk Prioritisation Numbers (RPNs). 1. Introduction The offshore oil and gas sector generates around £20 billion of revenue per annum and £12.8 billion of Gross Value Added (GVA) whilst supporting induced, indirect and direct employment of more than 190,000 people; thus, making it one of the key sectors of the UK economy [1]. This scenario is true not only for the West but also for major emerging economies; for example, in Nigeria, offshore oil

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Safety is of paramount importance when working at the dizzy height of a wind turbine. Brad Prickett, the senior lubrication engineer at ExxonMobil Fuels & Lubricants, located in Houston, gives PES his insight on how this can be improved. This is his area of expertise as he has worked with wind turbine operators since the mid-2000s. When it comes to the safety of your wind turbine operation, lubrication can have a bigger impact than you might think. That’s because the greatest safety risks to an operation typically occur during equipment servicing and maintenance. Take, for example, a routine oil change. What is a fairly straightforward process for ground-based equipment becomes much more complex for wind turbine equipment, as maintenance teams must ascend the tower, sometimes to elevations as high as 400 feet, before carefully inspecting the equipment to determine if any additional servicing is needed before refilling components with the new oil. This is no easy task, which is why one of the most effective opportunities to enhance the safety of a wind turbine operation is by reducing human-machine interaction (HMI), or the frequency which maintenance personnel interact with wind turbine equipment. Reducing HMIs requires having a robust lubrication program that prevents unnecessary downtime and

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Words: Kristian Holm, VP Renewables & Utilities at Kongsberg Digital A typical wind turbine is equipped with a huge number of sensors, signal processors, and other types of monitoring equipment to ensure that it maintains its autonomous operations. These data points provide a myriad of data which can be used to optimise the operation of the turbine, cutting maintenance costs dramatically. Usually, sensor data are used to maintain normal turbine operation. Temperature sensors reduce or stop the wind turbine if the oil temperature in the gearbox exceeds a set permissible limit. Vibration sensors stop the turbine if the vibrations surpass a set permissible limit. However, these sensors do not simply maintain operations; they add a host of other options to the wind turbine, and these can be used for operational excellence. Did you know that in less than a second a single wind turbine can forward up to 1500 data signals that provide information about the turbine status? If you are really smart, you’ll use this information to define the current condition of the turbine. And if you are really, really smart, you’ll use it to predict the future condition or the remaining useful life of the turbine. Moreover, since wind turbines hold

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PES brings you Jan De Nul’s experience of constructing the Tahkoluoto wind farm. The geographical location, the elements and the difficult terrain all posed different types of challenges. Previous knowledge gained on other ventures, suitable equipment and engineering skills were crucial to the success of this project. Possible ice and rocky soil: these were the conditions in which Jan De Nul Group installed the very first Finnish Offshore Wind Farm, Tahkoluoto. It is named after the port nearby, meaning ‘islet of the grindstones.’ In fact it was hard diabase bedrock below the seabed and a layer of moraine clay and boulders of different sizes on top of it. Being the remains of scraping glaciers in previous glaciation periods, it was a challenging environment in which to construct a wind farm, able to withstand the severe Finnish winters. None of the classical monopile driving methods, such as the one Jan De Nul Group used to construct the Belgian offshore wind farm Nobelwind, could be used here, in the Gulf of Bothnia, because of the soil conditions. An atypical design and construction of the wind turbine foundations was necessary. The only option was to place ballasted foundations on a prepared seabed. This was certainly no practice

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