Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

Operating for nearly 100 years, Peterson is the leading international logistics provider to the global energy industry and prides itself on thinking in generations, which is enshrined as a core company value. PES went to find out all about this reputable world company, which has always kept pace with the latest technology and innovations. The energy logistics company’s appetite for thinking in generations has allowed the company to evolve and respond not just to present requirements, but to anticipate future needs. This philosophy was behind the adoption of new technologies and innovative business systems, processes and strategies for efficient and cost effective solutions for customers, even before the recent downturn in the oil price. Therefore, it seemed only natural when three years ago, this global company began to explore the future-focused, renewable energy sector. Since then, Peterson has responded to requirements to support the offshore wind sector, offering a comprehensive range of safe, reliable and value added offshore wind logistic solutions to support clients, throughout the energy life cycle. However, with increased commitment from government bodies to enhance the uptake of renewable energy and more companies exploring this fast-moving sector, they have developed a comprehensive strategy that brings benefits to partners, clients and investors

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Even though the foundation may seem like a minor detail in a wind power development project with a EUR 50–200 million price tag, slow progress in foundation design, production and assembly will postpone the day when the investment starts to generate profits. With that in mind, Peikko has created a holistic solution consisting of the design, manufacturing and installation of both gravity and rock foundations. Since 2014, Peikko has been the technology distributor for more than 1,200 foundations for Nordic wind power projects. Success has come with a simple insight that is easy to relate to, whether you are an investor or a contractor. ‘Any delay in the building process will postpone the day when the investment starts to generate profit,’ Kari Tuominen, Business Director of Peikko’s wind turbine foundation business, noted. ‘It’s not a small detail we are talking about, as the overall price tag of these projects may well reach 1 billion euros.’ In 2012, Peikko started the quest for faster wind power projects by fine-tuning its design, manufacturing and installation process with gravity foundations. The result was quickly noticed and the market share rose quickly. Currently, around 600 wind turbines are built annually in the Nordic countries. One third of

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As of 2011 OWI-lab, in co-operation with the Vrije Universiteit, Brussels (VUB), has been conducting a long term structural monitoring campaign at all Belgian offshore wind farms. The measurements focus on the structural health of the substructure (SHM) rather than the wind turbine itself. PES is pleased to share this important research, which is sure to have an impact on future wind farm monitoring. This different focus was motivated by the operators of offshore wind farms. While the correct operation of the wind turbine is typically covered under a service level agreement with the turbine OEM, other vital components such as the substructure, foundation and cables along with the offshore high voltage station and grid infrastructure, fall under the responsibility of the operator. It was from their concerns that OWI-lab started to research and develop tailored monitoring solutions and search for decision support tools towards the substructure. Dealing with operators’ concerns One particular concern posed by the operators is the development of scour around the foundation. During scouring the seabed around the foundation is eroded, reducing the embedded length of the foundation. This has a direct effect on the structural properties. With the development of a scour hole, the exposed length increases and

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Gerry Lalonde, CEO, Orenda Energy Solutions, tells PES how he feels wind energy could be exchanged from one location to another. This is certainly food for thought and could make a big difference to small turbine owners, or perspective owners with no space near their current location. One of the chief concerns facing the small/medium wind energy industry is a geographical one, based purely on supply and demand. Imagine a business located in the middle of an urban area that wishes to be self-sustaining with its own ‘green’ electricity supply. If the business is located in an area where there is little or no wind and local planning laws preclude them from siting a small turbine on the property, is there not a conversation to be had with Government, which leads to a relaxing of the rules whereby any business can buy and erect a turbine on a ‘wind-friendly’ landscape, in another part of the country and have access to the equivalent amount of generated energy by these turbines from the grid? Is this not a classic case of supply not being efficiently matched to demand? Current legislation prohibits an energy consumer based on the South Coast of England, to purchase a wind turbine

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PES brings you Offshore Project Support, your complete service provider in the offshore wind industry. Smarter cost reduction and a more efficient offshore wind industry? It’s possible. Offshore Project Support (OPS) from the Netherlands combines the knowledge, experience and equipment of four different offshore companies. Together, they are ‘the toolbox at sea’. A complete service for every stage in wind energy projects. Niels Noordeloos is OPS’s managing director. ‘Titles don’t really mean much to me. I’m a practical kind of guy who just happens to know exactly what’s going on in the offshore industry. I enjoy managing projects and like to come up with safe and well considered solutions. With OPS I can offer my clients the services they need.’ Niels Noordeloos has worked in the offshore industry for 16 years and has been working as a freelance project manager over the last couple of years. ‘First in the gas and oil industry, later on in the offshore wind industry. At one point I was wondering if we could reduce costs by combining different projects. I envisioned a chain of wind parks from the southern part of the North Sea up to northern part of the North Sea. One vessel could sail to

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As renewable energy adoption grows worldwide, major utilities increasingly rely on wind power to serve homes and businesses with emission-free, clean electricity. Because of this growing interest in cleaner energy sources, the wind industry is experiencing a period of significant growth worldwide, exceeding 500 gigawatts and employing more than 1.2 million people. This growth has increased focus on issues like the equipment’s sensitivity to extreme environmental factors, subsequent power interruptions and revenue loss, increased maintenance, and maintenance-related safety risks. To keep up with this growing demand, operators must continue to stay ahead of potential challenges. Like all power sources, wind turbines are vulnerable to harsh weather conditions and require fail-safe operating systems such as emergency pitch units, commonly referred to as EPUs, which help safely halt turbine operation. As a result, turbine operators and owners are increasingly depending on electrical-based pitch control systems to perform this function. Traditional EPU (emergency power unit) In periods of total power failure, the EPU is equipped with an emergency power supply to return the blades to a safe position and allow the turbine to shut down effectively. These systems have typically relied on batteries to perform this function. Because of batteries’ electrochemical nature, they are prone to

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As renewable energy adoption grows worldwide, major utilities increasingly rely on wind power to serve homes and businesses with emission-free, clean electricity. Because of this growing interest in cleaner energy sources, the wind industry is experiencing a period of significant growth worldwide, exceeding 500 gigawatts and employing more than 1.2 million people. This growth has increased focus on issues like the equipment’s sensitivity to extreme environmental factors, subsequent power interruptions and revenue loss, increased maintenance, and maintenance-related safety risks. To keep up with this growing demand, operators must continue to stay ahead of potential challenges. Like all power sources, wind turbines are vulnerable to harsh weather conditions and require fail-safe operating systems such as emergency pitch units, commonly referred to as EPUs, which help safely halt turbine operation. As a result, turbine operators and owners are increasingly depending on electrical-based pitch control systems to perform this function. Traditional EPU (emergency power unit) In periods of total power failure, the EPU is equipped with an emergency power supply to return the blades to a safe position and allow the turbine to shut down effectively. These systems have typically relied on batteries to perform this function. Because of batteries’ electrochemical nature, they are prone to

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I know what you are thinking, right now you may be considering installing an offshore windfarm and here I am telling you about the problems of getting rid of the thing again. But! The topic is relevant whether you are installing a windfarm, nearing an end to the operational life, or actually in the process of preparing the decommissioning of the windfarm. Why, you might ask, is this relevant, the removal of the wind turbines is actually the reverse operation of installing it or not? The answer is that this is actually not the case. And as usual the devil is in the detail. Here are the reasons. In the early years I was frequently asked to give a quote for how much it would cost to remove an offshore turbine, my answer was simple, the same plus inflation as it would cost to install it. This is partly the answer, however a significant number of costs will occur which we did not foresee when we were originally asked. Firstly, the sheer number of turbines, which have to be removed, will make a significant impact to the port where you have to unload them. For the Danish and German North Sea, Esbjerg seems a good bet.

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Ideol has been in the news these last few weeks because Floatgen, France’s first offshore wind turbine, has successfully reached two key milestones Bruno G. Geschier, Chief Sales and Marketing Officer, at Ideol, came in to PES to talk us through this ground breaking project. Beyond the completion of the floater construction and the September fitting of the transition piece and the wind turbine at quayside, there were two decisive and delicate operations scheduled this summer: the pre-lay of the mooring lines as well as the float-off, or separation, of the concrete structure from the floating barges on which it was built. With cost competitiveness being a key driver in this emblematic project, we set out to design an innovative mooring system using nylon ropes several years ago. This being a first-of-a-kind we also had to develop and optimize specific offshore installation methods to ensure smooth, safe and rapid offshore operations. Having a fully integrated team of engineers covering all phases of the project, from conception to completion, helped us to integrate such offshore installation constraints and specificities very early on in the design and engineering phase, limiting many unforeseen and often costly surprises down the line. It also helped us collaborate efficiently with

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Once again PES has all the inside information from the upcoming wind fairs. This time it’s HUSUM Wind and the Offshore WIND Conference, Amsterdam. This is a great opportunity to meet the new comers to our industry, see all the latest developments, catch up with regular contacts and make new ones. So reserve the dates and book your tickets – maybe we’ll see you at one of them. A fresh breeze in the German market HUSUM Wind Trade Fair and Congress 2017 takes place from September 12th to 15th 2017, in the heart of Schleswig-Holstein, the wind state. This is where the who’s who of the wind industry comes together to compare notes about important industry issues and the latest developments and product innovations in the German and world markets. It has been the industry’s most important trade fair for the German market for over 25 years. This year it will be particularly interesting. Around 18,000 trade visitors and 650 exhibitors are expected from Germany and the neighbouring countries. They will be showing their products and services along the entire value chain. This established meeting place attracts trade visitors and experts from all sectors of the industry. Part of the discussions this year will

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