Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

Words: Kurt E. Thomsen I know what you are thinking, right now you may be considering installing an offshore windfarm and here I am telling you about the problems of getting rid of the thing again. But! The topic is relevant whether you are installing a windfarm, nearing an end to the operational life, or actually in the process of preparing the decommissioning of the windfarm. Why, you might ask, is this relevant, the removal of the wind turbines is actually the reverse operation of installing it or not? The answer is that this is actually not the case. And as usual the devil is in the detail. Here are the reasons. In the early years I was frequently asked to give a quote for how much it would cost to remove an offshore turbine, my answer was simple, the same plus inflation as it would cost to install it. This is partly the answer, however a significant number of costs will occur which we did not foresee when we were originally asked. Firstly, the sheer number of turbines, which have to be removed, will make a significant impact to the port where you have to unload them. For the Danish and German North Sea,

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The number of wind turbines used globally has grown exponentially over the last few years and with it so has the need for efficient and safer inspection methods. Ray Faulkner from iRed, an industry-leading thermographic consultancy and training centre, explains how Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs/Drones) are establishing a strong case for involvement. Renewable energy has now overtaken coal as the world’s biggest source of power-generating capacity. Clean energy costs are tumbling, with the potential for industry growth rapidly expanding. Britain has been at the forefront of developing this technology; however it’s in danger of falling behind. The rest of the world is catching on. China, for example, is working towards becoming a green energy superpower, with huge investments in solar energy. India is making strides in their development of wind power and Ireland has recently voted to become the first country to remove all dependence on fossil fuels. The UK has been the fastest growing green economy in Europe. Despite being a world leader in offshore wind - helped by having the second largest tidal range in the world - the UK has the potential to supply a far greater share of the country’s energy needs. According to Renewable UK, there are

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In February 2015, the Indian government announced its plans to almost quadruple its renewable power capacity to 175 GW by 2022 as part of the plan to supply electricity to every household in the country. This includes 60 GW from wind energy. Further, India made a commitment at COP21 to raise the share of non-fossil-fuel power capacity in the country’s power mix to 40% by 2030. Consequently, these plans and targets make the Indian market a unique fast moving and growing market where competitive companies can have great business opportunities. But, they also come with a complex and unstable legal framework where manufacturers find many obstacles on the way. Market developments In 2016, India set a national record with 3,612 MW of new installations, bringing the country’s total to 28,700 MW and consolidating its 4th position in the cumulative global rankings, according to the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) of India. India was among the top 10 countries in terms of renewable energy investment, according to UNEP & Bloomberg New Energy Finance. Also, India’s renewable energy sector held its position at the third spot for the second year in a row in the Renewable Energy Country Attractiveness Index (RECAI) released by

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Ever wonder how wind turbines operate autonomously, with such little human intervention, in the middle of the sea? Rico Shoeni, Market Manager for Industry at HUBER+SUHNER, gives PES an inside look at the latest developments and the type of technology currently in development to power offshore wind farms. With the ever-increasing effects of global warming, coupled with the environmental and economic costs of fossil fuels, never before has renewable energy been in such demand. A research report from the World Energy Council has even predicted that the world's demand for power is set to double by 2050, leading to a global rush to construct as many renewable energy sources as possible. One of the most popular and effective sources of clean, renewable energy is wind power. Now, when people think of wind turbines, the image that most likely comes to mind is the towering white windmill-esque structures usually set to the backdrop of rolling green fields. The most popular new venture for this technology, however, is in the realm of offshore turbine sites, located primarily on continental shelves across Europe and the World. Already, there are multiple offshore sites across Europe, comprising hundreds of separate turbines producing thousands of MW of

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The world of high-pressure hydraulics is constantly in motion. Within this dynamic the Dutch hydraulics specialist Holmatro is continuously developing high-quality solutions for industrial applications. After more than 50 years’ experience as a supplier to the shipbuilding and oil & gas industries, Holmatro developed the first TP levelling set in 2009, used in the construction of the Belgian offshore wind farm Belwind. The set proved to be so successful that they were also used during the construction of subsequent offshore wind farm projects, such as Walney, London Array, Westermost Rough, Dudgeon and many more. Since the introduction of the TP levelling set in 2009, Holmatro has significantly expanded its product range for offshore wind applications. Besides hydraulic solutions to level wind turbine foundations, the company has proven itself in the field of TP fixation, jacket fixation, cutting applications, seafastening equipment and skidding solutions. Holmatro tools are also used for the lifting, weighing and levelling of offshore platforms, the calibration of tension-leg platform (TLP) load cells and are integrated on pipe-laying vessels to support heavy lifting and moving applications. Wind turbine foundations consist of two large steel structures: a monopile (MP) that is driven into the seabed and a transition piece (TP) that

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At the beginning of March 2017 PES asked Steve Sawyer, secretary general GWEC, for his informed perspective on current wind production worldwide and his short term predictions. Overall, the wind industry globally started the year in good shape, with solid prospects for 2017 and beyond. Although we didn’t reach the 60 GW mark in 2016, largely because China ‘only’ installed 23 GW instead of last year’s phenomenal 30 GW, the industry chalked up 12.6% growth in cumulative capacity; with a 54.6 GW market leading to a total capacity at the end of the year of 486.7 GW, which will have by now (March 2017) passed 500 GW in total. In addition to China, Brazil, Mexico, South Africa and Canada were down a bit on the 2015 market; but these are largely cyclical issues, except in the case of South Africa and we expect to see them all turn around in 2017. India set a new national record with 3,612 MW of new installations, pushing it into fourth place in terms of annual capacity growth, and cementing it’s fourth place position in cumulative terms, behind China, the US and Germany. Germany passed the 50 GW mark in 2016 with installations of 5,443 MW, which

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Words: Geoffrey Taunton-Collins, Weather Risk Analyst, GCube Underwriting Ltd. As with any asset type, consistently ensuring reliable returns from renewable energy assets requires charting a course through a series of financial risks. For the wind industry in particular, given the fickle nature of the elemental force underpinning it, resource underperformance is becoming the principal concern for diligent asset managers and stakeholders over the lifetime of a project. There is now a growing awareness and recognition of the significant threat it poses to asset owners and their revenues. In an attempt to deal with this threat, weather risk cover has existed in one form or another since the late 1990s. However only now has it emerged as a comprehensive and reliable solution for those looking to stabilise their returns. This has been driven by developments such as longer contract periods, advances to settlement indexes and project-specific product tailoring. Given the decline of the contingent PPA (in some markets) and the additional exposure to price risk this has brought, there has been a growing interest in managing resource risk as a means to alleviate overall increases in revenue volatility. In conjunction with this greater awareness of the threat posed by fluctuations in weather

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The Spanish multinational NCLAVE (the result of the merger of the Grupo Clavijo and MFV Solar) has obtained the UL2703 certification for its single-post and dual-post fixed structures (granted by UL LLC), accrediting that it has exceeded the requirements of the electrical and mechanical safety standard "UL 2703 Standard for Mounting Systems, Mounting Devices, Clamping/Retention Devices, and Ground Lugs for Use with Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Modules and Panels". One of the Spanish company's strategic objectives is to offer maximum quality and safety in its products and processes, adapting to the requirements of all international markets. The UL2703 standard is added to the CE marking, obtained last year through the integration of the EN 1090 standard for structural component requirements, the ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 standards, the TÜV-NORD certifications (structural safety of fixed structures) and the bankability report by Black & Veatch (B&V). With more than 12 years of experience, 2 GW installed and offices and production centres on five continents, Nclave, made up of Grupo Clavijo and MFV Solar, is one of the leading companies in the design, manufacture, installation and maintenance of structures and trackers for the solar photovoltaic market.   More information: www.nclave.es

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Nantes, France, 10 April 2017. Neoen, a leading renewable project developer and owner, has chosen QOS Energy’s innovative O&M management platform to monitor the performance of the 315 MW Hornsdale wind project, which will be amongst the largest wind farms operating in Australia once fully commissioned. The project, consisting of 96 Siemens 3.2MW wind turbines, is being built in three stages; two of which have been completed. Neoen has deployed Qantum®, the IEC compliant energy management SaaS powered by QOS Energy, to monitor the two first stages of the project.  One main benefit for Neoen is the fact that no additional hardware or system installation is required onsite to run the software, which allows for a swift and cost effective set-up of data acquisition processes. The platform gathers and analyses data generated by each turbine for all measured values using a secure VPN connection. Qantum® is compatible with every kind of wind turbine, communication standard or database connection protocol. “We are very proud of the successful collaboration we have with Neoen for this important project. Our day-to-day challenge is to deliver best-in-class O&M analytics services for some of the largest renewable projects in the world. Project after project, Qantum® continues to showcase its

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Orenda’s claims it now has the highest-rated turbine available in the sub-50kW band and qualifies for the best FiT currently available in the UK. Edinburgh, Scotland; Monday 10th April 2017; Orenda Energy Solutions Limited, a turbine manufacturer for the global medium distributed wind industry, has secured accreditation under the Microgeneration Certification Scheme (MCS) for its 49kW Skye wind turbine, making it the highest rated turbine in the sub-50kW band that qualifies for FiT in the UK. The MCS accreditation was awarded to Orenda following detailed independent testing, inspection and assessment by SGS, one of the world’s leading inspection, verification, testing and certification company, establishing that the design, construction and safety architecture of the Skye turbine complies with EIC’s 61400-1 stringent operational standard published by the International Electrotechnical Commission regarding wind turbines. Rigorous power performance and noise testing was also carried out on the Skye Turbine at the Myers Hill Wind Farm, in East Renfrewshire, by independent assessors TÜV-NEL, providing calibrated performance data and third party validation of Skye’s capabilities. Gerry Lalonde, CEO Orenda Energy Solutions comments; “The MCS accreditation is an exhaustive process, but ultimately gives consumers the confidence they need that a turbine has been independently assessed to the highest standards available. More

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