Power & Energy Solutions

The premier renewable energy publication

Words: Steve Sawyer, secretary general at GWEC The dramatic drop in price of solar and wind generated electricity, for solar in particular, has grabbed a lot of attention lately. Prices in the range of $US 0.03-0.04/kWh have come through in tenders from Peru to Mexico and Morocco to South Africa. It is almost to the point where in the big picture, price doesn’t matter so much anymore. As penetration levels begin to increase, the emphasis will be much more on how to integrate them into the power system, or rather to transform the power system to work with wind and solar’s particular characteristics. But when people are talking about wind, they are increasingly adding ‘onshore’, to distinguish it from its large, slow and expensive cousin, offshore wind. But maybe not for much longer. There has been a lot of positive news from the increasingly dynamic offshore sector of late. Until recently the best prices we had heard of for offshore was €103/MWh for the Horns Rev extension in early 2015, which was considered a very positive sign of things to come. However, just about everyone was surprised by the record low prices in the Dutch auction for 700 MW at the Borssele offshore

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Steve Sawyer, Secretary General, GWEC, gives a global overview of wind power during 2015, a very positive year culminating in the Paris agreement in December. He predicts a steady growth in the industry over the next five years. Wind Power Leads All New Power Generation More than 150 nations gathered in New York, on Earth Day, to formally sign the landmark climate change deal which was agreed in Paris last December, an all too rare triumph for multilateralism in a world that desperately needed one. Outgoing UNFCCC head Christiana Figueres, just named one of Time Magazine’s most influential 100 people in 2015, has predicted that the treaty will enter into force no later than 2018, two years ahead of schedule. We need the extra time. While there are many positive signs, Mother Nature is sending signals of another sort: weird weather, droughts, floods, unprecedented Arctic sea-ice retreat, record high winter temperatures and Greenland’s annual glacier melt season started two months early. CO2 levels are rising at an alarming rate and we are now in uncharted territory in terms of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, at least since Homo sapiens have been around.

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Words: Prof. Dr.-Ing. Jan Wenske, Deputy Director IWES Northwest Dr.-Ing. Maik Wefer, Division Director Structural Components IWES Jan Wenske and Maik Wefer of Fraunhofer IWES, show PES how testing should be regarded as a method to accelerate time to market of new designs and stand out by offering approved overall system reliability – instead of restricting the view to the one-time expenses. An opportunity to improve turbines and technology and enhance the competitiveness. The positive outcomes, however, outweigh this expense by far. What can offshore wind turbine development and wind farm projects be compared to? Certainly not their onshore counterparts. The differences are obvious and include the following: offshore wind turbines are much larger and more powerful, the wind and environmental conditions are quite different, the foundation structures and installation work are more complex, they are connected to the grid via HVDC (high-voltage direct current transmission) or converter stations, undersea cable must be laid and, last but not least, the technical and economic track record of this comparatively young industry is shorter. However, probably the greatest difference is that offshore turbines are more difficult to get to and access when in operation. Thus, the operation of a turbine in an offshore wind power

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We look at the European Wind Energy Association (EWEA)’s view of the future energy landscape beyond 2020. Current targets set out for 2030 in Europe will see the wind energy sector and other renewable technologies transform the power sector and bring positive impacts to the European power system and the economy as we pivot towards the new normal of renewable energy becoming our main source of electricity. As targets set in Brussels call for renewables to make up at least 27% of energy consumed, Giles Dickson, Chief Executive Officer of the European Wind Energy Association invites policy makers to go beyond the bare minimum. In their report ‘Aiming High’ published in February 2016, the EWEA examines the extra rewards of taking a more progressive view as a reminder to policy makers of the opportunity that wind energy presents. We provide a summary of the report here. With 392 GW installed, wind energy can be the single largest source of power generation in the EU by 2030 ahead of coal and gas. Wind energy already plays a significant role in the European power sector. In 2014, the wind industry installed 11,791 MW in the EU – more than gas and coal combined. Today wind

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Words: Paul Goodwin, Global Maritime, Pablo Ruiz-Minguela, TECNALIA, José Luis Aguiriano, OCEANTEC For all the growth in solar and wind energy over the past few years, one often over-looked and untested renewable source is that of wave energy. Yet, wave energy is generally considered to be one of the most concentrated renewable energy sources today and one that is also complementary to solar and wind with the potential to help facilitate the practical introduction of more renewables into the European energy grid. The different elements of the mooring system deployed at BiMEP this summer. Image courtesy of TECNALIA Wave energy – opportunities and challenges The World Energy Council estimates that approximately 2 terawatts (2 million megawatts) - about double current world electricity production - could be produced from the oceans via wave power. The European Union also forecasts that wave energy has the potential to supply some 10% of European electricity needs - about half of today’s renewables total. Yet, despite its attractiveness, potential obstacles remain. Wave energy costs remain high compared to conventional forms of energy and there have been limited open-sea deployments to date. The complexities behind harnessing wave power have also led to a variety of designs and technologies with little consensus

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Thijs Haselhoff, New Business Development Manager at Altheris Sensors & Controls and Eric Préfontaine, Business Development Manager at OpSens Solutions, responsable for the Energy market, together tell PES about this new state-of-the-art technology and explain why fibre optic sensors are perfectly suited to the Renewable Energy market. PES: Welcome to PES magazine. Thanks for talking with us. Would you like to begin by explaining a little about the background of your organisation and how you currently serve the offshore industry? Thijs Haselhoff: Altheris is a specialised partner for sensors, instrumentation, measurement systems and industrial joysticks for OEM, Test & Measurement and Automation Control Applications. We turn every measurement challenge into a sensor solution and advise and help you every step of the way. Altheris and the Althen group have established a partnership with OpSens Solutions based in Canada for fibre optic sensors. Altheris is a member of the Althen Sensors & Controls group with its offices in the Netherlands, Germany, France and the USA.

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Seatools completes delivery of HighWire taut wire system upgrade for Boskalis On behalf of its client Boskalis, Dutch subsea technology company Seatools completed the upgrade of a HighWire survey grade taut wire system. The upgraded position reference system will be deployed to determine the position of a subsea cable plough during a subsea cable installation project executed by Boskalis. Initially delivered in 2001, the HighWire system served Boskalis during the installation of submerged sewage outfall pipes in challenging conditions. Because of their positive experience using the HighWire system, Boskalis decided to rely on the system again. This time, however, the wire orientation needed to be changed from nearly vertical to nearly horizontal. Although the update required fundamental modifications of both the system’s mechanical design and its software, alterations were made in as little as three weeks. The upgraded system performed excellently during factory testing – it even outstripped the 2001 accuracy level of 1 centimetre, measured across significant distances. The system’s high level of accuracy will provide significant value for subsea cable owners, facilitating easy identification and recovery of a buried cable when in need of repair. Jan Frumau, Managing Director at Seatools, was pleased to learn that Boskalis chose the Highwire system

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“A breakthrough in offshore logistics!” Vroon is proud to announce that walk-to-work vessel VOS Start is to be equipped with the brand-new Barge Master Gangway. This unique combination will enable safe and efficient transfer of personnel and cargo. The Barge Master Gangway incorporates an access tower with elevator, providing stepless access. The adjustable pedestal provides full flexibility in landing heights. With the participation of Bosch Rexroth in the Barge Master team, the highest quality and safety standards are guaranteed. This unrivalled, next-generation walk-to-work vessel will be available to the offshore industry in Q2 2017. “During the development of the gangway we worked closely together with Vroon”, says Martijn Koppert, CEO of Barge Master. “We developed a total logistics solution for efficient installation and maintenance of offshore platforms and wind turbines. The small footprint, its light weight and the modular design with hoisting, elevator and many other options have led to this next-generation gangway. The end product is a fit-for-purpose gangway system that can be purchased or hired at a very competitive price. We are convinced that this is the gangway clients are looking for nowadays.” “Making our clients successful by providing safe and efficient solutions, now and in the future, is what Vroon Offshore Services is about”,

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Figure is up by more than a million tonnes on previous year Industry welcomes new statistic ahead of Westminster reception  The amount of harmful CO2 displaced by Scotland’s renewable energy sector has increased by almost 10% – or more than a million tonnes – in one year, new UK Government figures show. More than 13 million tonnes of the gas, the main driver of climate change, was displaced by clean power from technologies such as wind turbines, hydropower and solar in 2015, the most recent year for which figures are available. The new statistic on renewable electricity featured in a written answer from the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and is equal to more than a quarter (28%) of Scotland’s carbon emissions in 2014, the most recent year for which statistics are available. Ahead of a Westminster Reception held by Scottish Renewables in London this evening (Wed October 19), the organisation’s Chief Executive Niall Stuart told how the increase shows the continued benefits of renewable energy deployment – but insisted more could be done. He said: “These new figures show the ever-growing contribution of renewable energy to the fight against climate change. “Due to policies at both Westminster and Holyrood renewables now provide the majority of Scotland’s electricity – but the sector’s future is far less certain. He explained: “Onshore wind has been behind much of the rise in renewable electricity capacity in the last ten years, but we expect both onshore wind and solar to be excluded from the next round of auctions for contracts for low carbon power. “Both technologies could make a significant contribution to meeting our

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Renewable energy plays an increasing role in meeting rising energy demand. The Offshore Energy Exhibition & Conference (OEEC)  focuses not only on the conventional exploration and production of oil and gas but also on the renewable part of the energy mix. Find out the latest in developments regarding marine energy and offshore wind during OEEC. The 7th annual Offshore WIND Conference, to be held on 24 and 25 October 2016 as part of Offshore Energy, will focus on business opportunities and successes in this renewable energy industry and how, together, the industry can reach its potential. A promising future awaits the offshore wind industry as long as we can tap the potential opportunities amongst the challenges that lie ahead. The agreements made during COP21 in 2015 provide support and encouragement to reach the hard targets ahead of these future projects. During the Offshore WIND Conference, more than 15 expert speakers and over 250 industry professionals will discuss what is needed to reach large scale offshore wind energy deployment. Both days plenary sessions will be alternated with networking opportunities. Head to www.offshorewindconference.biz for the full program and speaker faculty. From offshore wind to marine energy. In partnership with EWA the Marine Energy Event

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